October 29, 2021

24 of the most haunted places in metro Detroit to scare your pants off

Here in metro Detroit, something sinister looms. Ghosts, anyone? We're talking music venues, bars, museums, old asylums, and even statues that are said to be haunted. We're talking creaking stairs; doors and windows opening without human intervention; moaning, crying, and howling coming from all directions; foul odors, and old ghost cops pelting visitors with rocks.

In other words, some seriously spooky shit. While not everyone believes in ghosts, who some believe are spirits that have unfinished business on this plane of existence, but stick a non-believer alone in Westland's former Eloise Psychiatric Asylum with nothing but a flashlight and we bet they'll change their tune... to a scream. These are but a few of the Detroit area's most haunted spots. Happy haunting?

 

 

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Fair Lane, Home of Clara and Henry Ford
1 Fair Lane Dr., Dearborn; 313-668-3200; henryfordfairlane.org
The Fair Lane estate, which was where Henry Ford died, is allegedly haunted by a ghostly butler who has appeared inside of the vehicles on the grounds, which is totally terrifying. The estate has been investigated by a Michigan paranormal team that said they recorded evidence of various strange sights like floating orbs and mist. Though the home is closed to the public for a massive restoration effort, the grounds are open to the public, so visitors can try and see for themselves. Oh, and there have been reports of doors and windows opening and closing on their own. PASS!
Photo via  Henry Ford Estate/Facebook

Fair Lane, Home of Clara and Henry Ford


1 Fair Lane Dr., Dearborn; 313-668-3200; henryfordfairlane.org
The Fair Lane estate, which was where Henry Ford died, is allegedly haunted by a ghostly butler who has appeared inside of the vehicles on the grounds, which is totally terrifying. The estate has been investigated by a Michigan paranormal team that said they recorded evidence of various strange sights like floating orbs and mist. Though the home is closed to the public for a massive restoration effort, the grounds are open to the public, so visitors can try and see for themselves. Oh, and there have been reports of doors and windows opening and closing on their own. PASS!

Photo via Henry Ford Estate/Facebook
Northville Psychiatric Hospital
41000 Seven Mile Rd., Northville
Opened in 1952 and closed 50 years later, this hospital might just be home to some patients that have yet to leave. At the time, this Northville facility was touted as Michigan's first attempt at scientific treatment of mental illness, and had everything from a movie theater, bowling alley, and therapeutic baths available to patients. However, the tunnels, which were designated as fallout shelter at the height of the Cold War, have been the source of some of the facility's spookiest paranormal shit, like hearing voices, footsteps, and clanking chains. Some have even reported having experienced touch and breathing down their necks by the unseen. While the asylum is no longer standing, it is said to be surrounded by a creepy-ass forest where many of the spirits have allegedly relocated to. 
Photo via 
Northville Psychiatric Hospital/Wikipedia Commons

Northville Psychiatric Hospital


41000 Seven Mile Rd., Northville

Opened in 1952 and closed 50 years later, this hospital might just be home to some patients that have yet to leave. At the time, this Northville facility was touted as Michigan's first attempt at scientific treatment of mental illness, and had everything from a movie theater, bowling alley, and therapeutic baths available to patients. However, the tunnels, which were designated as fallout shelter at the height of the Cold War, have been the source of some of the facility's spookiest paranormal shit, like hearing voices, footsteps, and clanking chains. Some have even reported having experienced touch and breathing down their necks by the unseen. While the asylum is no longer standing, it is said to be surrounded by a creepy-ass forest where many of the spirits have allegedly relocated to.

Photo via Northville Psychiatric Hospital/Wikipedia Commons
Two-Way Inn 
17897 Mt. Elliott St., Detroit; 313-891-4925; 2wayinn.com 
Detroit’s oldest bar, Two-Way Inn has one hell of a history — and you bet it’s haunted. Established in 1876 and now a watering hole, the building once served as a brothel, general store, a jail, and a Prohibition Era-speakeasy. Anyway, the former owner and resident of the inn, Philetus Norris, has been said to have been seen by patrons and owners. Reports note that the Union spy, archaeologist, and Yellowstone National Park superintendent still dons his cowboy-like duds, even in the afterlife.
Photo via Two-Way Inn/Facebook

Two-Way Inn


17897 Mt. Elliott St., Detroit; 313-891-4925; 2wayinn.com
Detroit’s oldest bar, Two-Way Inn has one hell of a history — and you bet it’s haunted. Established in 1876 and now a watering hole, the building once served as a brothel, general store, a jail, and a Prohibition Era-speakeasy. Anyway, the former owner and resident of the inn, Philetus Norris, has been said to have been seen by patrons and owners. Reports note that the Union spy, archaeologist, and Yellowstone National Park superintendent still dons his cowboy-like duds, even in the afterlife.

Photo via Two-Way Inn/Facebook
Westland’s Former Eloise Psychiatric Asylum
30712 Michigan Ave., Westland; eloiseasylum.com 
Once the largest psychiatric asylum in the country and, later, a beloved abandoned playground for urban explorers, Westland's hulking Eloise Psychiatric Hospital has been called “the Holy Grail” of paranormal investigation sites. Since it closed in 1981, the site has maintained a grisly history that is the stuff of urban legends. Originally erected as the Wayne County poorhouse in 1839, it soon housed people with mental and psychiatric disabilities, and at its peak, developed into a sprawling campus of 75 buildings that cared for as many as 8,000 patients a day. This year a new immersive experience was introduced for anyone brave enough to explore the asylum. 
Photo via Detroit Paranormal Expeditions

Westland’s Former Eloise Psychiatric Asylum


30712 Michigan Ave., Westland; eloiseasylum.com
Once the largest psychiatric asylum in the country and, later, a beloved abandoned playground for urban explorers, Westland's hulking Eloise Psychiatric Hospital has been called “the Holy Grail” of paranormal investigation sites. Since it closed in 1981, the site has maintained a grisly history that is the stuff of urban legends. Originally erected as the Wayne County poorhouse in 1839, it soon housed people with mental and psychiatric disabilities, and at its peak, developed into a sprawling campus of 75 buildings that cared for as many as 8,000 patients a day. This year a new immersive experience was introduced for anyone brave enough to explore the asylum.

Photo via Detroit Paranormal Expeditions
Ypsilanti’s Michigan Firehouse Museum
110 W Cross St., Ypsilanti; 734-547-0663; michiganfirehousemuseum.org 
When Al G. Dyer Jr. took over as director of Ypsilanti's Michigan Firehouse Museum in July of 2018, he was warned that he'd likely be contacted by ghost hunters interested in the building's alleged paranormal activity. As far as the actual nature of the museum's alleged haunting, Dyer says he is still trying to get the story straight. The gist of it is this: The former fire station's chief Alonzo Miller died in 1940, and is believed to haunt the building. Immediately after his death, Miller's crews reported hearing strange noises in the station, with reports extending into the 1970s.
Photo via Ypsilanti’s Michigan Firehouse Museum/Facebook

Ypsilanti’s Michigan Firehouse Museum


110 W Cross St., Ypsilanti; 734-547-0663; michiganfirehousemuseum.org
When Al G. Dyer Jr. took over as director of Ypsilanti's Michigan Firehouse Museum in July of 2018, he was warned that he'd likely be contacted by ghost hunters interested in the building's alleged paranormal activity. As far as the actual nature of the museum's alleged haunting, Dyer says he is still trying to get the story straight. The gist of it is this: The former fire station's chief Alonzo Miller died in 1940, and is believed to haunt the building. Immediately after his death, Miller's crews reported hearing strange noises in the station, with reports extending into the 1970s.

Photo via Ypsilanti’s Michigan Firehouse Museum/Facebook
Elmwood Cemetery
1200 Elmwood St., Detroit; 313-567-3453; elmwoodhistoriccemetery.org 
Elmwood Cemetery was first dedicated in 1846 and holds the title of Michigan's oldest operating cemetery. Some of Michigan's most famous residents have been buried here; from governors to war heroes, and this cemetery is the location of the Battle of Bloody Run. With so much history, surely paranormal activity could be part of it.
Photo via Elmwood Cemetery/Wikipedia Commons

Elmwood Cemetery


1200 Elmwood St., Detroit; 313-567-3453; elmwoodhistoriccemetery.org
Elmwood Cemetery was first dedicated in 1846 and holds the title of Michigan's oldest operating cemetery. Some of Michigan's most famous residents have been buried here; from governors to war heroes, and this cemetery is the location of the Battle of Bloody Run. With so much history, surely paranormal activity could be part of it.

Photo via Elmwood Cemetery/Wikipedia Commons
Historic Fort Wayne
6325 W. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-628-0796; historicfortwaynecoalition.com 
The land that Detroit's Fort Wayne sits on was once a Native American burial mound, and when the mounds were excavated in the early 20th century, remains as old as 900 years were found. Funny enough, the hauntings reported here usually revolve around the dealings of the American troops that carried out orders here. Many paranormal investigations have taken place here, and folks say they've found definitive evidence that this place is really haunted. Disembodied footsteps and voices have been reported along with ghostly figures.
Photo via Historic Fort Wayne/Facebook

Historic Fort Wayne


6325 W. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-628-0796; historicfortwaynecoalition.com
The land that Detroit's Fort Wayne sits on was once a Native American burial mound, and when the mounds were excavated in the early 20th century, remains as old as 900 years were found. Funny enough, the hauntings reported here usually revolve around the dealings of the American troops that carried out orders here. Many paranormal investigations have taken place here, and folks say they've found definitive evidence that this place is really haunted. Disembodied footsteps and voices have been reported along with ghostly figures.

Photo via Historic Fort Wayne/Facebook
The Masonic Temple
500 Temple St., Detroit; 313-832-7100; themasonic.com
The largest Masonic Temple in the world is right here in our backyard. Opened in 1926, Detroit's Masonic Temple spans 14 floors with 1,037 rooms including bowling lanes, a barbershop, two ballrooms, a chapel, and a 17,500 square foot drill hall, and the massive building is said to be home to many paranormal experiences. (Those who believe in sort of thing say the temple is currently haunted by George D. Mason, who went bankrupt because he helped to fund the construction of the temple. After that, his wife left him. Mason killed himself by jumping off the top of the temple.) Guests have been said to encounter cold spots and doors shutting suddenly. 
Photo via GoogleMaps

The Masonic Temple


500 Temple St., Detroit; 313-832-7100; themasonic.com
The largest Masonic Temple in the world is right here in our backyard. Opened in 1926, Detroit's Masonic Temple spans 14 floors with 1,037 rooms including bowling lanes, a barbershop, two ballrooms, a chapel, and a 17,500 square foot drill hall, and the massive building is said to be home to many paranormal experiences. (Those who believe in sort of thing say the temple is currently haunted by George D. Mason, who went bankrupt because he helped to fund the construction of the temple. After that, his wife left him. Mason killed himself by jumping off the top of the temple.) Guests have been said to encounter cold spots and doors shutting suddenly.

Photo via GoogleMaps
St. Agnes Church
7601 Rosa Parks Blvd., Detroit
St. Agnes Church was originally built in 1921 and was abandoned in 2006. Some say a nun’s spirit can be felt inside, who was once part of the church's congregation. Oftentimes visitors feel cold spots, smell strange smells, and hear bizarre bangs. A haunt for the senses! 
Photo via St. Agnes Church/Google Maps

St. Agnes Church


7601 Rosa Parks Blvd., Detroit
St. Agnes Church was originally built in 1921 and was abandoned in 2006. Some say a nun’s spirit can be felt inside, who was once part of the church's congregation. Oftentimes visitors feel cold spots, smell strange smells, and hear bizarre bangs. A haunt for the senses!

Photo via St. Agnes Church/Google Maps
Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org
We have no Night at the Museum fantasies about the Detroit Institute of Arts after learning that security guards have been said to encounter strange activity at night, like reports of hearing loud thuds and other unexpected noises. Most of the bizarre activity is said to occur in the African art gallery, where the "Nail Figure" is. 
Photo courtesy of DIA

Detroit Institute of Arts


5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org
We have no Night at the Museum fantasies about the Detroit Institute of Arts after learning that security guards have been said to encounter strange activity at night, like reports of hearing loud thuds and other unexpected noises. Most of the bizarre activity is said to occur in the African art gallery, where the "Nail Figure" is.

Photo courtesy of DIA