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Wednesday, February 2, 2005

I Am Kloot

Posted By on Wed, Feb 2, 2005 at 12:00 AM

The self-titled second album from Manchester trio I Am Kloot finally gets a domestic release, a year-plus after the British rock press went typically batty for it. Still, now is probably a good time, with Kloot’s third album dropping in March and a swell of UK groups (Keane, Coldplay) making hay in America with what amounts to background music for scented baths. Now, I Am Kloot isn’t the rockingest band, but they do offer a richer palette of post-Brit-pop sounds than many of their peers (Badly Drawn Boy excluded), and Johnny Bramwell possesses the usual fleet of flinty vocal tics and perceptive lyrics about lovers leaving and other sucky situations. He could be a jaded cousin of David Gray on “Cuckoo” and “Sold as Seen,” and “Life in a Day” roils with a deconstructed form of vintage Manchester groove. Meanwhile, “Here for the World” and “Same Deep Water as Me” soften with the addition of subtle programming, strings and acoustic guitar, and “Strange Arrangement of Colour” detours effortlessly into jazz timing. This is how I Am Kloot goes. It doesn’t knock you over the head; it climbs inside instead. Maybe the winter release was the right idea, after all.

Johnny Loftus writes about music for Metro Times. E-mail letters@metrotimes.com.

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