Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Sci-fi sex

Smart new film probes genetically altered future

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

A detective tale set in future where genetic engineering has led to a state of quiet totalitarianism, and where a paramount concern of the state is the prevention of accidental “couplings” of lab-bred people whose genetic profiles may be too similar. Tim Robbins is the private eye and Samantha Morton is the love interest in this smart, moody film.

Continue reading »

Divan

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

This charming documentary takes us on a quixotic quest to Hungary in search of a sentimental family divan (sofa), and throws us into a tale of a young woman who has strayed from her Hasidic Jewish Brooklyn roots. It’s both a well-crafted home movie and a good-natured examination of identity, socialization and related issues.

Continue reading »

She Hate Me

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

A young corporate exec blows the whistle on his unethical employer (a pharmaceutical firm working on an AIDS vaccine, no less), finds himself pink-slipped and discovers a new line of work as a stud for lesbians (beginning with his ex-girlfriend, no less). Does this sound like director Spike Lee once again packing a film with too many ideas (and polemics) for its own good? It is. Does his visual panache — not to mention a Terrence Blanchard score — help balance his excesses? They do.

Continue reading »

Intimate Strangers

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

A woman seeking a psychiatrist’s office accidentally ends up sharing her tale of marital strife, emotional abuse and dreamed-of escapes with an accountant. With each visit, the accountant’s affection for her deepens. Eventually wise to his deception, she begins her own. Depending on your point of view, the inconclusive ending is either poetic or a rip-off. Directed by Patrice Leconte (Man on the Train, Monsieur Hire).

Continue reading »

Zhou Yu's Train

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

Everything in this Chinese puzzle of a romance, co-written and directed by Sun Zhou, seems to be devised to distract you from the essential corniness of the story. And it’s not a very good puzzle either. Starring the great Gong Li, star of Raise the Red Lantern.

Continue reading »

Without a Paddle

Posted By on Wed, Aug 25, 2004 at 12:00 AM

This is a guy flick, in the “burp, scratch and pat your buddy on the back” sense, from director Steven Brill, whose credits include Little Nicky and Mr. Deeds. Three old friends (Dax Shepard, Matthew Lillard and Seth Green) take off on a quest to find a thief’s booty in the backwoods. They brave yokels, a waterfall and a wild bear in a film that finds itself up the proverbial creek.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, August 18, 2004

Roses, revolution & Dudley Randall

The Detroit poet-publisher helped ignite a boom in black literature

Posted By on Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 12:00 AM

It is a “marvel,” a “curious thing,” wrote the Harlem Renaissance poet Countee Cullen, “to make a poet black, and bid him sing!” Like all good poets, Cullen twines strands of meaning. But in the literal sense, he was hardly visionary. In a typical week, metro Detroit hosts, for...

Continue reading »

A good week

Finally some summer delights for hungry eyes

Posted By on Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 12:00 AM

Documentary of a five-day train ride/multi-concert swing through Canada featuring bands like the Grateful Dead, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Buddy Guy and Janis Joplin, who died shortly after filming was completed. The music is showcased in a refreshingly unslick, unpretentious fashion.

Continue reading »

Distant

Posted By on Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 12:00 AM

A sympathetic tale about two people in Istanbul who can’t connect to each other — or anyone else for that matter. Beautifully filmed in a pensive navel-gazing style that will either drive you mad with boredom or suck you into its meditative groove.

Continue reading »

Garden State

Posted By on Wed, Aug 18, 2004 at 12:00 AM

Written, directed by and starring Zach Braff from TV’s scrubs, this film boasts a quirky, wry and sometimes warped humor. It’s somewhat sentimental, but blissfully free of the omnipresent slapstick and bathroom humor that’s stinking up studio comedies of late.

Continue reading »

Best Things to Do In Detroit

Most Popular

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

© 2021 Detroit Metro Times - Contact Us

Website powered by Foundation