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Wednesday, August 29, 2001

This is our music

Tracing the roots of Motor City jazz, from McKinney’s Cotton Pickers to bop.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

At least in books, jazz fans have long been able to stroll the red-light district of New Orleans with Jelly Roll Morton, ride Mississippi riverboats where King Oliver and Louis Armstrong’s cornets pealed shoreward, and hang out from sundown to the next morning’s steak breakfast while listening to Kansas...

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Doobie duo

Jay and Silent Bob take a hilarious toke off the old bong.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

Director Kevin Smith parodies pop culture in a way the Wayans Brothers could only dream about. His humor may be frat-boyish at times, but underlying it is an acceptance of all races, genders and sexual orientations. Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back ends up as one hilarious nation under a funky groove.

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The Curse of the Jade Scorpion

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

In Woody Allen’s comic, Technicolor love letter to the silver screen of the ’40s, there’s ironic comedy in portraying Allen’s weasely investigator as a romantic leading man. But the sweetness of his blend of vintage Hollywood has an aftertaste like the reverberations of a Gershwin tune.

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Down from the Mountain

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

Even those less than thrilled by the Coen Brothers' O Brother, Where Art Thou? had a kind word for the sound track, a good sampling of musical Americana; emotionally direct, plain-spoken, deeply soulful. This is a film record of the concert given by many of the Brothers’ performers in Nashville on May 24, 2000.

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Bubble Boy

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

A combination of Frankenstein and a lesser John Waters has dug up The Wizard of Oz to reanimate it as a satirically fractured American fairy tale about a so-called "Bubble Boy" (a child born without a functioning immune system), sending him on a mad race for the graillike Oz of connubial true love.

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John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

In 2176, long after Mars has been successfully colonized, a simple reconnaissance mission exposes a terror with global ramifications. Grueling and relentless, this brazen, in-your-face movie is done in Carpenter’s trademark no-frills style. What makes it so disturbing is the intimate nature of its barbarity — with Pam Grier and Ice Cube.

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Substance and style

Haruki Murakami fills his latest volumes with a fictional love triangle and a real-ife terrorist cult.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

Perhaps the most typically "Western" of a modern, fecund batch of Japanese writers, Haruki Murakami has jury-rigged a style from the subterranean preoccupations of Don DeLillo, the geography of catastrophic relationships laid bare by Raymond Carver, and the hellish, quasi-sci-fi specters of Stephen King. And yet, despite all his influences...

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Substance and style

Haruki Murakami fills his latest volumes with a fictional love triangle and a real-life terrorist cult.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

Perhaps the most typically "Western" of a modern, fecund batch of Japanese writers, Haruki Murakami has jury-rigged a style from the subterranean preoccupations of Don DeLillo, the geography of catastrophic relationships laid bare by Raymond Carver, and the hellish, quasi-sci-fi specters of Stephen King. And yet, despite all his...

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The Trembling

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

Pink, plush and itchy guitar, bass and drums insulate this wall of frantic but steady rhythm, while shouted grrl-ish lyrics crash into clever melodies that will flatten you with their "yeah, I know!" honesty. But the rhythms are so strong and fun you'll want to make up dances for each...

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Porn again

How the government lost its war on erotica

Posted By on Wed, Aug 29, 2001 at 12:00 AM

A little more than 100 years ago, a New Haven, Conn., dry-goods-store clerk named Anthony Comstock decided, as he wrote in an 1882 article for the North American Review, that "there was a very large and systematic business, of the most nefarious character, carried on to corrupt and destroy...

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