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Wednesday, October 25, 2000

My Brain

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

My Brain provides a silly, sweet soundtrack for lo-fi fans to plug into -- a variety show of poppy songs about bunny rabbits and candy bars punctuated with drum machine beats and spiked with synthesizers. It's a wonderful world filled with happy-ending TV reruns and pretty girls who work...

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Big Mouth strikes again

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

As one of the converted to whom Tom Tomorrow preaches, I feel awkward criticizing his comic, “This Modern World.” Calling “TMW” wordy and graphically uninteresting is like saying Ralph Nader is adenoidal and needs a haircut. But the air-quotes irony of Tomorrow’s 1950s clip-art style is played out, and...

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Advert nutrition

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Spend a minute figuring out whether this magazine is really titled “Issue” or if the publisher is just being sneaky by withholding its “real” name, and you’ll have entered into the vertigo-driven world of advertising. (Or you’ll just notice how deep you’re already in it.) Issue tugs down the...

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Smooth lit

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

What’s a gigolo to do? So much untended pussy and so little time. Pity poor Malcolm. When he isn’t jetting from LA to Chicago to “Hotlanta” to offer phallic comfort to lonely sistas with MBAs, he’s struggling to keep hope alive for true love and a retirement gig as...

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Scrap heap sentiments

Local writer Michael Zadoorian's novel features a Gen X-Y protagonist with a passion for junk.

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Conventional wisdom says that almost all first novels are autobiographical. If this is true, say a prayer for Detroit writer Michael Zadoorian. His protagonist, a day-dreaming nerd called Richard, has been on the ropes for a while. He runs a secondhand shop, Satori Junk, in what one assumes is...

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For dear life

A corner of pain ignored by the new world order.

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Director Bahman Ghobadi's quietly devastating film is storytelling at its unvarnished best. The subject is an orphaned family of Iranian Kurdish children struggling to survive amid political upheaval. Their quiet determination and dignity are reflected in the beautiful simplicity of Ghobadi's visual style.

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Coming To Light: Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indians

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Photographer Edward S. Curtis, in Anne Makepeace's documentary of his life, comes across as someone sincere but realistic, who embarked on an obsessive project to document as thoroughly as possible the quickly disappearing traditional life of the Native American.

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The Yards

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Trapped in slippery morality and cycles of crime, Mark Wahlberg, Joaquin Phoenix and Charlize Theron are a triptych of good intentions gone awry in James Gray’s strikingly old-fashioned, beautifully nuanced tale of corruption.

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Goya in Bordeaux

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Director Carlos Saura's Goya (Francisco Rabal) is alternately avuncular and cranky, deaf but still vital and prone to slipping into a dream world of bittersweet memories. Saura’s biopic is a lushly filmed wallow in the loves and tribulations of a long-suffering artist.

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Two Family House

Posted By on Wed, Oct 25, 2000 at 12:00 AM

Sometimes playing like a laughless episode of a revisionist "The Honeymooners," this House is a fixer-upper. Its plot is slow to build, with little motivation for the extreme actions of its main characters. But it focuses on cultural, racial and marital relationships in ’50s America in a fresh, surprising way.

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