Wednesday, January 15, 1997

Heart-hitter

Daniel Day-Lewis performs powerfully in this emotionally and politically charged story .

Posted By on Wed, Jan 15, 1997 at 12:00 AM

With the force of an expert punch, The Boxer precisely (and bluntly) delivers its emotional story, effectively drawing the audience into a world where violence and hatred are ingrained into individuals and society. Just as Danny Flynn (Daniel Day-Lewis) is released from prison after a 14-year stint, a cease-fire...

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Buddha's little helper

Martin Scorsese's rendering of the young Dalai Lama's life is eye-popping and compassionate.

Posted By on Wed, Jan 15, 1997 at 12:00 AM

In the last third of his career, filmmaker Martin Scorsese has used celluloid almost entirely for charting messianic figures and characters beset by wicked forces. From that standpoint, his new feature, Kundun, about the early life and exile of the 14th Dalai Lama, makes perfect karmic sense. Indeed, the...

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A Seedy Side of French Life

Claire Denis sketches the uneasy lives of free-floating young people.

Posted By on Wed, Jan 15, 1997 at 12:00 AM

Like her only other film to receive any significant American distribution &emdash; Chocolat (1988), a meditative depiction of an 8-year-old French girl living in colonial Africa &emdash; Claire Denis' Nenette et Boni is less a story than a series of incidents, a sketch of a particular time and place...

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French Film Noir

Director-screenwriter Jacques Audiard's "Un Héros Très Discret" is white hot satire as well as riveting entertainment.

Posted By on Wed, Jan 15, 1997 at 12:00 AM

It's well known that the film noir is one of America's most popular cinematic exports. What might not be so familiar to movie buffs is how noir has singly become an emblem for the disintegration of social norms and assumptions, even in the face of efforts to revive it....

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Thawing frozen emotions

Alan Rickman turns director, bringing his approach to acting to a film filled with nuance.

Posted By on Wed, Jan 15, 1997 at 12:00 AM

When an actor turns director, and then stays behind the camera, a strange thing often happens. Whether it comes consciously or unconsciously, the overall tone of the film manages to encapsulate his approach to acting. The Winter Guest draws its strengths from the same kind of brooding, inquisitive quietness...

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Monday, January 6, 1997

The wolf moves to Paris

As inventive as the film is, the lack of solid script leaves you wanting.

Posted By on Mon, Jan 6, 1997 at 12:00 AM

It's clear from the opening moments of An American Werewolf in Paris -- the camera pans from a full moon peering ominously through clouds, downward to caress the exterior of a rain-washed, gargoyle-encrusted Parisian church, then to the ground where a terrified man emerges from a manhole -- that...

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It's literary cinema

Mondo approaches complete strangers with the question, "Will you adopt me?"

Posted By on Mon, Jan 6, 1997 at 12:00 AM

For the everyday working person, the persistence of tedium from day to day can be a killer. Tedium displaces new experience. The practice of lived monotony is harsh, because it leads us to replace intuition with protocol, thus making us forget the simple joys of life's unfolding. The fortunate...

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War as comedy

This film draws a parallel between war and frantic farce.

Posted By on Mon, Jan 6, 1997 at 12:00 AM

Perhaps the most typically "Western" of a modern, fecund batch of Japanese writers, Haruki Murakami has jury-rigged a style from the subterranean preoccupations of Don DeLillo, the geography of catastrophic relationships laid bare by Raymond Carver, and the hellish, quasi-sci-fi specters of Stephen King. And yet, despite all his...

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Made for pathos

The medium is the massacre in two new films about war in prime time.

Posted By on Mon, Jan 6, 1997 at 12:00 AM

Politics makes for strange bedfellows. But the union of politics and television ranks as one of the oddest -- and most inevitable -- couplings of the past half-century, drastically altering how political events are viewed. Two new films, Welcome to Sarajevo and Wag the Dog, deal very differently with...

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Made for pathos

Made for pathos The medium is the massacre in two new films about war in prime time.

Posted By on Mon, Jan 6, 1997 at 12:00 AM

Politics makes for strange bedfellows. But the union of politics and television ranks as one of the oddest -- and most inevitable -- couplings of the past half-century, drastically altering how political events are viewed. Two new films, Welcome to Sarajevo and Wag the Dog, deal very differently with...

Continue reading »

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