See our Best of Detroit 2020 winners.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

MSU won't let white supremacist Richard Spencer speak at school

Posted By on Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 5:04 PM

click image PHOTO BY VAS PANAGIOTOPOULOS VIA FLICKR
  • Photo by Vas Panagiotopoulos via Flickr

Michigan State University officials will not allow white supremacist leader Richard Spencer to speak at the campus.

A statement issued by the school Thursday afternoon says the decision was made after consulting with law enforcement.



"This decision was made due to significant concerns about public safety in the wake of the tragic violence in Charlottesville last weekend," the statement reads. "While we remain firm in our commitment to freedom of expression, our first obligation is to the safety and security of our students and our community."

The National Policy Institute, where Spencer serves as president, contacted MSU on Wednesday seeking an appearance on its East Lansing campus in September. The school said it would closely review the request "in light of the deplorable violence in Charlottesville," where a white nationalist protest turned deadly.

MSU isn't the first school to deny Spencer the chance to speak since the events in Charlottesville. University of Florida officials also shut down a request by his group to have him speak next month after "assessing potential risks."

Tags: , , ,

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.

Read the Digital Print Issue

October 28, 2020

View more issues

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

Best Things to Do In Detroit