December 26, 2019

Photos show contamination at the factory responsible for toxic ooze on I-696

The toxic, bright green liquid discovered oozing onto I-696 in Madison Heights came from a shuttered factory that environmental officials spent about $2 million and nearly a year to clean up.

So how did the green slime, which was groundwater contaminated with cancer-causing hexavalent chromium, end up on a freeway? Read more here.

All photos taken in 2017.

Photos by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Pit in the basement.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Pit in the basement.
Map and location of samples collected.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Map and location of samples collected.
Basement conditions.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Basement conditions.
First floor plating.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
First floor plating.
Rock for grading and preparing the parking area where the command post will be located.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Rock for grading and preparing the parking area where the command post will be located.
Crew using rock to prepare parking lot where command post will be located.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Crew using rock to prepare parking lot where command post will be located.
Drums of waste in west building.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Drums of waste in west building.
Spent plating waste in vat.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Spent plating waste in vat.
Unsafe floor rusting through.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Unsafe floor rusting through.
Stairs leading to plating lines.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Stairs leading to plating lines.