Night and Day 

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY • 8-9
BALTIMORE ROUND ROBIN
ROW, ROW, ROW YOUR BOAT

Schizoid dance maniac Dan Deacon has rounded up his BFFs from the Baltimore music scene for two nights of eclectic sounds. The round robin-style show means there's no opener, no headliner and no normal audience arrangement. Instead, bands circle the room while the audience stands in the middle (weird, right?). Each band plays one song per round, back-to-back with no breaks. Night One, aka "Eyes Night," features music that is gauzy and ethereal (the kind that's mostly boring live). Night Two is "Feet Night," and features booty-shaking, body-vibrating tunes. Both nights will also feature a "Weird Round" of zany neither-feet-nor-eye acts that will pop up when you least expect it. More than 29 performers are scheduled to roll into town (in vans fueled by vegetable oil, no less) including Beach House, Jana Hunter, Lexi Mountain Boys, Adventure, Blood Baby and the Deathset. At 6:30 p.m. at MOCAD, 4454 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-832-6622; $8 per night or $15 for both nights or free with 10 gallons of waste vegetable oil. Visit thecrofoot.com for info, including a complete lineup.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY • 9-12
HEATHER RAFFO'S 9 PARTS OF DESIRE
EAST MEETS WEST, YET AGAIN

Through the stories of nine different Iraqi women, this one-woman play explores the Iraqi consciousness and America's relationship to it. By giving voice to the hopes, fears and dreams of Iraqi women, Arab-American playwright and actress Heather Raffo shows audiences the similarities that cross cultures, but also how these similarities are limited by Iraqi women's experiences living under Saddam Hussein's rule and through two wars backed by American firepower. 9 Parts of Desire makes a strong statement about every culture's reliance on feminine strength, but it also raises many questions about America's uneasy and entangled relationship with Iraq. At Performance Network Theatre, 120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; visit performancenetwork.org for info.

FRIDAY • 10
ACCUMULATION ART OPENING
STUFF HAPPENS

Artists Andrew Thompson and Amanda Thatch are a couple with an issue, and that issue is stuff. Thompson views stuff as the raw material for his creations, and amasses as much stuff as possible. Thatch on the other hand, dislikes stuff. And out of this dispute, an art installation is (somehow) born. The couple has taken over the main gallery of Paint Creek Center for the Arts and used all matter of shit (oops! we meant stuff) to transform the space into one large, walk-in art project (or a shining example of a couple's therapy). At 7-9 p.m. at Paint Creek Center for the Arts, 407 Pine St., Rochester; 248-651-4110; pccart.org. Exhibit runs through Nov. 8.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY • 10-11
VIRGIL MOOREFIELD
SENSORY SATURATION

Synesthesia is the phenomenon of cross-sensory experience, when the stimulation of one sense triggers the experience of another sense. While synesthesia is an involuntarily neurological occurrence, artists such as composer and drummer Virgil Moorefield attempt to re-create the experience of synesthesia in intermedia art (the new buzz term that refers to works that meld visual and sound arts). Moorefield's latest piece "Five Ideas About the Relations of Sight and Sound" utilizes computers to convert sounds into live-generated images that are projected onto multiple screens. It's an exploration of the complex interconnectedness of what we experience visually and what we experience aurally. In other words, you'll be able to hear the colors, man. At 8 p.m. Duderstadt Center, 2281 Bonisteele Blvd., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3266.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY • 10-11
WINARD HARPER SEXTET
GIVE THE DRUMMER SOME

The drummer came through the Betty Carter combo, one of the great jazz finishing schools, before co-leading the acclaimed Harper Brothers band with sibling Philip on trumpet in the late-'80s and '90s and then leading his own groups while remaining a sought-after sideman. A reviewer who caught the sextet in Kansas City was driven into a near-tautological frenzy: "Just about the only thing as entertaining as a night of Winard Harper at the KC Jazz Club is, well, a night of Winard Harper somewhere else." Like Detroit? Shows at 10 and midnight at the Jazz Café at Music Hall, 350 Madison Ave., Detroit; 313-887-8501.

SATURDAY • 11
THE SCARAB CLUB ANNUAL COSTUME BALL
UNDER THE BIG TOP

Last year, the Scarab Club celebrated its centennial (and raised some funds) by resuscitating its famed costume balls, held annually from 1917-1950 and considered the posh social event of the time. The tradition continues this year with the revival of 1928's "Under the Big Top" circus-themed ball, also known immodestly as "The Biggest and Best Ball." Under the ubiquitous red and white striped circus tent, guests can enjoy cotton candy and popcorn, circus-appropriate entertainment provided by rock 'n' roll puppeteers Gepetto Files and performance artist Satori Circus, and music from DJs JKenobi and Daedulus. Prizes for best costume will be doled out, along with treats and a few surprise tricks. All that's missing is a sideshow. At 8 p.m. at the Scarab Club, 217 Farnsworth, Detroit; 313-831-1250; scarabclub.org. $50 with full bar and $25 with keg beer only.

SATURDAY • 11
CHILD BITE
SCREECH AND WAIL

Horns, beards, synth, mad shredding and screeching vocals are a recipe for madness and ultra-frenetic, hott rock from this local act to watch. Part of the Suburban Scrawl music collective and indie record label, Child Bite is on tour across the great, wide-open Midwest to promote their latest full-length Fantastic Gusts of Blood. Their feverish, fast and frantic (not to mention sweaty) live show will roll back into town with F'ke Blood, STNNG and Benny Stoofy at Small's, 10339 Conant, Hamtrack; 313-873-1117; smallsbardetroit.com.

SATURDAY • 11
THE NIAPELE PROJECT BENEFIT SHOW
LISTEN, DRINK, HELP

The Niapele Project is a nonprofit that works in conjunction with local community organizations to provide aid and support to refugee children. The show will benefit the Project's current initiatives in Liberia, which include implementing school nutrition programs and providing aid to the Abandoned Children's Refugee Home. A scenester-beckoning lineup of local acts, including American Mars, Gardens and the Decks, will be joined by Appalachian mountain princess Elizabeth Butters and Toledo bluesmen Dooley Wilson and John Roundcity. Handmade goods from a Liberian refugee camp in Ghana will be available for purchase and entry will only cost you $8 — not much for a great lineup and a worthy cause. Doors at 6 p.m. at PJ's Lager House, 1254 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-961-4668. For more info on The Niapele Project visit theniapeleproject.org.

SATURDAY • 11
ERIC VLOIEMANS
GETS GREAT MILEAGE

The trumpeter — born and based in the Netherlands, but seasoned between in New York — name-checks Don Cherry and Booker Little among influential faves. But on Hyper (Challenge), his new disc, it's the amped-up dynamics of electric-era Miles Davis that jumps out at a listener. There's the use of wah-wah (and other electronics), the shift from cool vamps to brass pyrotechnical displays. Not that you can ignore his affection for other jazz influences (like Clifford Brown) or his conventional classical training as well. The Dutch sensation's U.S. debut with his current lineup (just trumpet, electric piano and electric guitar) includes a stop at West Coast jazz mecca Yoshi's after his gig at Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit (CAID), 5141 Rosa Parks, just north of Warren, Detroit; 313-899-2243.

SUNDAY • 12
SPHINX CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
CLASSICAL, DIVERSIFIED

The Sphinx Orchestra is made up of the top alumni from the Sphinx competition, an event held every year to encourage the participation of young African-Americans and Latinos in classical music. For their first tour, the orchestra will perform traditional classical pieces, as well as works by contemporary composers of color, dispelling the myth that only dead white guys with crazy hair know jack about classical music. With violin soloist Elena Urioste and the Harlem Quartet at 2 p.m. at Orchestra Hall at the Max M. Fisher Music Center, 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-576-5111; detroitsymphony.com.

TUESDAY • 14
EMU AS MUSE: A PROJECT OF THE TELEGRAPH ART COLLECTIVE
COLLEGIATELY ARTFUL

The Telegraph Collective originated in Detroit, but its members are now scattered around the country. While collaborative efforts take place at a distance — hence the appellation Telegraph — the group occasionally convenes in a common locale to work on a project, as they have done for EMU as Muse. The artists will spend the 72 hours preceding the opening — and maybe even the opening itself — creating works using the material and matter of Eastern's campus — from the people to the litter — not only as muse, but as the actual creative material for their works. The emphasis of the show is on the process as opposed to the end product, a point dramatically demonstrated by this fact: After the exhibition closes, the works will be recycled or painted over — going back from whence the came, so to speak. At 5-7 p.m. at EMU's University Art Gallery in the Student Center, 900 Oakwood, Ypsilanti; 734-487-0465 for info. Exhibit runs through Nov. 24.

More by Megan O'Neil

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