Mark Hackel doesn't understand why officials celebrated the conclusion of Detroit's bankruptcy


Following U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes' decision to approve Detroit's proposed restructuring plan to emerge from bankruptcy, top officials involved in the process spent the better part of an hour congratulating one another on a job well done. 

That kind of attaboy! mentality carried over into the weekend, when one of the city's restructuring consultants, Conway MacKenzie, felt it was an appropriate time to take out an ad in the Sunday edition of The New York Times to tout the firm's services. The city, it's worth noting, reportedly paid Conway $17.2 million for its efforts. 

With that in mind, recently-reelected Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel has no idea why the moment was deemed cause for celebration. From The Macomb Daily

Hackel took issue with the lack of mention of those who were impacted by proceedings, specifically pensioners and suburban water users. Most Macomb County municipalities are hooked into the water and sewer system previously owned and operated by Detroit. They will now be serviced by the Great Lakes Water Authority, an entity that Hackel says was “forced” on the suburbs, which will have a vote on a regional board.

“It should be a lesson learned, not a celebration,” Hackel said of the response officials had to Rhodes’ ruling. “This was all contrived. A lot of people suffered as a result of this.”

About The Author

Ryan Felton

Ryan Felton was born in 1990 and spent the majority of his childhood growing up in Livonia. In 2009, after a short stint at Eastern Michigan University, he moved to Detroit where he has remained ever since. After graduating from Wayne State University’s journalism program, he went on to work as a staff writer...
Scroll to read more Metro Detroit News articles
Join the Metro Times Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state.
Help us keep this coverage going with a one-time donation or an ongoing membership pledge.

Newsletters

Join Detroit Metro Times Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.