Get to know the Detroit talent playing the ‘Micro Movement’ electronic music festival 

click to enlarge DJ Minx performs Sunday at TV Lounge. - COURTESY OF PAXAHAU
  • Courtesy of Paxahau
  • DJ Minx performs Sunday at TV Lounge.

Though the annual Movement electronic music festival isn't able to take place for the second year in a row due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, festival organizer Paxahau has created a new way to celebrate: Micro Movement, a smaller, limited-capacity festival, with nearly 50 Detroit artists across all genres of electronic music and hip-hop playing at select local venues over Memorial Day Weekend.

The festival is sponsored by Select Cannabis. "We understand that many Michiganders, myself included, are looking forward to seeing the stages come back to life after a challenging year," says the company's marketing manager, Lissa Satori. "So many artists, promoters, and venues that have been in limbo through the pandemic are eager to get back to entertaining." Paxahau urges fans to be patient for this unprecedented event. "As the producers of Movement Festival, we had to do something for Memorial Day Weekend but we didn't know exactly what our options were until about a month ago," Paxahau president Jason Huvaere says. "We're asking those who plan to attend in person to please be compliant and understanding with the venue staff as they manage the weekend and maintain their entry policy should they reach capacity."

The venues are TV Lounge (2548 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-965-4789), the Magic Stick's Alley Deck (4140 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-9700; majesticdetroit.com), and Spot Lite (2905 Beaufait St., Detroit; spotlitedetroit.com), a new venue by fine-art print house and art gallery 1xRun. Below are some of the artists performing, listed in alphabetical order by venue. Set times are to be announced; follow Paxahau for more information.

Friday, May 28

TV Lounge

• Delano Smith: One of the OGs of Detroit house music. For decades, Smith has held down clubs across the world (and of course, in Detroit) as a master of the decks.

Kevin Saunderson: Fans of Detroit techno know the name Kevin Saunderson. As one of the three founders of the internationally renowned music genre, Saunderson is often called "The Elevator" of Detroit techno — and he holds up to that name in his seriously dance-heavy sets.

LadyMonix: Deep and groovy, LadyMonix brings forth a sound that's both dance-worthy and chill. As a Baltimore native, the producer and DJ is now based in Detroit and collaborates with artists across the country.

The Alley Deck

• Adam Westing: Starting as a rock and metal guitarist, this Detroit-based DJ has been performing on stage since the age of 12. His eclectic style combines house and techno influences with his rock roots.

• Andrea Ghita: Andrea Ghita pulls from a variety of influences when it comes to her performances. She combines a mix of techno, house, electro, and ghetto for a custom blend.

• Gettoblaster: Made up of Zach Bletz and Paul Anthony, this house and techno duo combines Chicago's house music scene with Detroit's techno revolution.

• Plus Size Models: Winner of the 2018 Dirty Bird Campout Competition, Plus Size Models, aka Chris Sutton, combines influences from ghettotech, techno, and Chicago house.

• Raedy Lex: Mixing fast tempo beats and catchy samples, Michigan artist Raedy Lex's music spans from deep house, progressive house, and other electronic dance music sounds.

• The AM: The AM, or Ann-Marie Teasley, got her start as a classical violinist. Her sound is a blend of the hard techno that earmarked Detroit's rave days in the '90s and a softer combination of soulful vocals and edits.

Spot Lite

• DJ Head: DJ Head is a three-time Grammy Award-winning hip-hop producer. He's produced songs for everyone from Eminem to Jay-Z, including Xzibit and Obie Trice.

• Donna Gardner: Donna Gardner has long been an advocate for Detroit dance music history. As a member of the board of directors of the Detroit Sound Conservancy, which aims to preserve the city's musical heritage, Gardner has a true passion for music that translates into her style.

• Eastside Jon: As a mainstay of Slow Jams Detroit, which puts on weekly dance music showcases, Eastside Jon combines funk with classic grooves. Expect to hear a lot of rare cuts dropped throughout his sets.

• ERNO: Expect to hear a ton of disco bangers in Erno's set, who pulls sounds from different generations of dance music both local and international.

Saturday, May 29

TV Lounge

• DJ Holographic: As a one-woman machine, this funk master is known to drop everything from house to techno in her genre-spanning sets.

• Secrets: As the alias of Detroit artist Matt Abbott, Secrets is known for his ability to dig out obscure hits from his vast record collection. His style is equal parts quirky and funky, blending a mix of techno and house with disco and boogie.

• Terrence Parker: As one of the pillars of soulful house music, Terrence Parker (aka TP) has been making people dance for decades and has fans around the world. He combines techno, gospel, soul, disco, jazz, and downtempo to create his unique sound.

• Waajeed: From his role as a member of hip-hop and R&B group the Platinum Pied Pipers to his collaborations with J Dilla, Waajeed has had a storied career. He blends a mix of musical genres to form his unique signature sound.

The Alley Deck

• DEEPFAKE: This anonymous Detroit duo adds a little mystery to their sets, using anti-facial-recognition masks to remain in the shadows while they drop hard-hitting techno beats.

• Gateo: Matthew Robinson (aka Gateo) combines influences from techno, house, and bass to fuel his high-energy hypnotic sound.

• Gino: DJ, producer, visual artist, and self-described student of Detroit and its dance music legends, Alex Gaggino (aka Gino) hosts Snack Time, a weekly happy hour at TV Lounge focused on artistry and community.

• Henry Brooks: As one of Detroit's next generation of techno artists, Henry Brooks is taking the influences of the past and blending them with his own flair, with a melodic, dark, driving, and hypnotic sound.

• Mona Black: Equal parts techno and house and a big fan of Prince, Black brings forth funky, dance-heavy mixes that have steadily become a staple on Detroit dance floors.

• Nic Joseph: Combining techno styles from Detroit to Glasgow, DJ/producer Nic Joseph uses deep bass hooks and minimalist vocal looping to create his own style of house music and tech house.

Spot Lite

• G.Next & Big Strick: Influenced by Motown acts like the Temptations, Marvin Gaye, and the Four Tops, G.Next and Big Strick put a soulful twist on everything they do.

• Hotwaxx Hale: Known as the "Godmother of House Music," Stacey (Hotwaxx) Hale has been ingrained in the city's house music scene since the '80s. She plays and creates dance music bangers, teaching her DJing and production skills to others, as well.

• Michael Fotias: As the production manager of Paxahau, Fotias is deeply steeped in the city's techno scene, and his work as a master of sound shines through in his live performances.

• Vincent Patricola: A veteran of the Detroit dance music scene, this DJ and producer is a little bit soul, a little bit funk, and a little bit house. He's also the publisher of Detroit Electronic Quarterly, dedicated to the city's dance music culture.

Sunday, May 30

TV Lounge

• Carl Craig and Stacey Pullen: These Detroit techno icons, who both helped build the city's dance music culture, consistently pack nightclubs around the world with their performances.

• Craig Gonzalez: Craig Gonzalez has had a passion for vinyl since a young age. Now he brings that passion to his sets, which include a mix of underground techno blends.

• DJ Minx: Inspired by Detroit's dance music scene since the late '80s, DJ Minx, Detroit's "First Lady of Wax," has been spinning vinyl for three decades. She's also a longtime advocate for promoting and helping other women build careers in music production.

• Kyle Hall: Hall has been hailed by Detroit dance music powerhouses Omar-S and Theo Parrish as one of the city's most promising young talents. He plays a deep house style and is also the founder of record label Wild Oats Music.

• TYLR_: Originally hailing from Toledo, Tyler Yglesias ( aka Tylr_) has spent the last eight years making a name for himself in the Motor City. His sets feel both classic and new, pulling from the sounds that built Detroit electronic music and blending them with modern-day influences.

The Alley Deck

• ADMN: The Detroit DJ and record label owner keeps the sound of late-night warehouse parties alive. His style is influenced by the roots of Detroit techno, which you can hear in each performance.

• Dan Bain: This genre-defying DJ is known for mixing house, techno, indie, trip-hop, and anything else from his crates of vinyl.

• Pierre Lacroix: Better known as one half of the Midnite Jackers, Lacroix has been DJing for more than 20 years, playing a slick blend of all things house.

• Remote Viewing Party: A project by Detroit artists and producers Aran Daniels and Mike Petrack, who play a combination of Detroit techno and house music. As a staple of the city's dance music scene, this duo can often be found playing at storied techno club TV Lounge.

• Wave Point: As the new solo project from Bryan Jones, who previously made up one-half of Detroit-based house music duo Golf Clap, Wave Point gives summer vibes to traditional house.

Spot Lite

• Jakob Harris: This up-and-coming indie artist drops mixes influenced by rap and hip-hop. His sound is a perfect fit for fans of bass and beats.

• Jesse Cory: Jesse Cory has built a name for himself in the art world as one of the founders of Detroit art publisher and gallery 1XRUN. That work also translates into the music scene, where Cory plays house music that he's been collecting since the mid-'90s.

• Malik Alston: A musician through and through, Malik Alston is simultaneously a composer, musician, performer, and engineer. Pulling from early influences of jazz, R&B, classical, and, of course, dance music, Alston combines these genres to create a soulful, groovy sound.

• Norm Talley: As one of the building blocks of Detroit deep house, Norm Talley has influenced the city's dance music culture for nearly four decades. Influenced by the early dance music scenes of disco and progressive, Talley has created a whopping 400-plus mix CDs to date.

Monday, May 31

TV Lounge

• Al Ester b2b Bruce Bailey: Both Detroit house namestays, Al Ester and Bruce Bailey have soulful, groovy tastes in music that perfectly complement one another in a back-to-back set.

• ATAXIA b2b Mister Joshooa: Detroit techno duo ATAXIA will combine forces with TV Lounge manager Mister Joshooa to drop a dance-worthy set that only local heavyweights can bring.

• Chuck Daniels: Chuck Daniels is known for bringing out the classics. With a mix of house and techno, Daniels often pays homage to the individuals who built Detroit electronic music.

• Loren b2b Jorissen: TV Lounge resident Loren is a staple of Detroit's newest generation of techno DJs. Paired with fellow TV Lounge resident Jorissen, who also holds true to the classic Detroit techno sound, these two will combine forces in a back-to-back set.

• Matthew Dear: Matthew Dear is renowned worldwide for his avant-pop approach to electronic music. With early roots as a co-founder of dance label Ghostly International, Dear is known for his experimental twist on the sounds that built Detroit techno.

The Alley Deck

• Chris Worthy: This producer, DJ, and record label owner started making music at the age of 11. Since then, he's perfected his art to put out a Detroit-centric sound.

• Damarii Saunderson: The son of Detroit techno pioneer Kevin Saunderson stays true to his family's roots. Also bringing forth dance-heavy techno sounds, Damarii Saunderson is helping keep the city's techno legacy alive.

• Dantiez: As the son of Detroit techno pioneer Kevin Saunderson, Dantiez takes after his father to keep the next generation of Detroit techno going strong — with his own twist.

• Dru Ruiz: Born and raised in Detroit, Ruiz is a gifted turntablist and the mastermind behind the Old Miami's Sunday party series.

• Drummer B: This self-made producer, DJ, art collector, and musician airs his musical chops in live performances. He's collaborated with everyone from techno mavens Juan Atkins and Derrick May to Detroit rapper Danny Brown.

• Grant Jackson: As a DJ and promoter, Jackson is the force behind a number of Detroit events, including Taco Tuesdays, Soup Sessions, and After Hours Brunch at the Alley Deck.

• King Saadi: Influenced by Detroit's eletro and ghettotech cultures, King Saadi often collaborates with one of ghettotech's founders, DJ Godfather.

Spot Lite

• Dez Andrés: As a former DJ in hip-hop group Slum Village, Andrés combines a little hip-hop with a little electronic.

• LadyMonix: Deep and groovy, LadyMonix brings forth a sound that's both dance-worthy and chill. As a Baltimore native, the producer and DJ is now based in Detroit and collaborates with artists across the country.

• Milan Ariel Atkins: The daughter of Detroit techno pioneer Juan Atkins, Milan Ariel performs pop that combines elements of techno, hip-hop, and neo-soul.

• Rick Wilhite: Often known as the "godson of Detroit house," Rick Wilhite pays homage to that title with some seriously funky sets. Pulling from R&B, techno, house, disco, and even reggae, Wilhite is a master DJ who's hailed for his style around the world.

• Sheefy McFly: As a rapper, producer, DJ, designer, and visual artist, McFly taps into his strong creative background to put out a bass-heavy sound.

• Stefan Ringer: Though based in Atlanta, Stefan Ringer has a strong Detroit connection. He plays Detroit-style house and regularly collaborates with Detroit dance music artists, playing deep, groovy cuts.

Lee DeVito and Sean Taormina contributed to this report.

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