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Don and Katrina Studvent’s new place is a bistro, if there can be an American version with a soul food foundation, and no liquor license for a few more months. It’s a bistro in the sense that it’s a family-owned place that serves moderately priced, relatively simple dishes and simple meals. It’s pretty, with attractive prices and a $13 Sunday brunch buffet that includes catfish with grits, chicken with waffles. Other choices are fried potatoes, turkey sausage, country bacon, fried ham, fried turkey, omelets, French toast, fresh fruit, breads and pastries.
Dinners include two sides plus cornbread ... fried catfish is a favorite! Also try the fried chicken, pork chops, or meatloaf. Sides include macaroni and cheese, collard greens, yams, black-eyed peas and other down-home favorites. For dessert, try sweet potato pie, peach cobbler or three-layer cake. Take-out only.
Upscale traditional and non-traditional soul food served in a casually elegant ambience. Lots of African-American history to browse while dining.
The decorations are simple because this place is meant to be for carryout only. Big Fellas Barbecue and Bakery wants its customers to keep their focus strictly on the food. Greg and Valena Cade, both food-service veterans, opened Big Fellas to show off their cooking talents while fulfilling the soul food needs of hungry diners on the east side of Detroit. Big Fellas serves barbecued ribs, chicken, seafood, sandwiches, salads, soups and homemade desserts. The owners recommend that first-time diners try their rib snack, soul style wing dings or jumbo butterfly shrimp. To assure freshness and good quality, dishes are prepared right when you order.
Downtown Windsor's home for downhome Southern comfort food in a casual fun atmosphere. Taking pride in making dishes from scratch like grandma used to, Biscuits' standard fare includes homemade breakfast sausage, hush puppies, gumbo, mac and cheese, collards, candied yams, sweet potato fries, fried chicken, fried catfish, sweet tea and much more.
Open since June 2007 on Friday nights only, the “speakeasy” soon achieved critical mass , attracting a crowd of young, mostly white hipsters. What brings them? The drinks list is ordinary, and owner Larry Mongo is less than exacting when it comes to recruiting musicians. So it’s not the drinks and it’s not the tunes, and most patrons don’t hang out for late-night food, either. They could, though. The limited soul food menu features some very fine sides at $3 a la carte, and if the ribs and half-a-barbecued chicken aren’t world-class, they’re at least decent, served in a standard sweet-smoky sauce.
The Detroit Princess is a 5 story riverboat located in downtown Detroit. Serving lunch and dinner most weekends and some weekdays. The two and a half hour cruise takes in the scenery of both Detroit and Windsor, cruising past Belle Isle and up to the mouth of Lake Saint Clair.

With linen tablecloths and napkins, chandelliers, mahogany trim, brass ceilings, dance floors and bars on all levels, the Princess is a very elegant venue for your night out.

Dinner features a five entree buffet of carved prime rib, chicken Florentine, teriyaki grilled salmon, chipotle apricot glazed pork chops and vegetarian lasagna, along with potato dauphinoise, cheese tortellini with pesto cream sauce, wild rice, Caribbean vegetable medley, assorted salads, dinner rolls and dessert.

Entertianment is a bonus with the Motown tribute band the Prolifics. They will dazzle you with their matching outfits, crocodile leather shoes and in- step Motown signature theatrics. Other entertainment options on certain nights include Jimmy Buffet's Margaritaville featuring Michigan's own Air Margaritaville tribute band, blues by Randy Brock and Dixieland jazz by the Bayou River Band. On late night moonlight cruises, DJs Captain Sky and Lighting Rod Stinson play nightclub style music.

Private dining rooms are available for parties from 50 to 450 people. The whole boat is available for up to 1900 people. They also cater to ethnic groups, Halal, Kosher, Indian just to name a few.

Visit detroitprincess.com for an up-to-date schedule. Reservations are required.

Featuring chicken, fish, ribs, meatloaf, sandwiches, soups, and cheesy mac and cheese. Located in the Penobscot Building.
Popular spot for afternoon networking and late night clubbing! Located in a beautiful historic building near Greektown. Known for its magnificent bar and live entertainment. Appetizers, sandwiches, soulfood. Live jazz, R&B and top-40.

Best of Detroit 2002
Best place to move and shake
You can tell by the bottlenecked line of glimmering Jags, Beemers, Mercedes and SUVs lined up for valet parking that this is a nightspot where the Motor City’s elite come to meet. The food’s OK, but that ain’t the point; it’s the tailored clientele and top-shelf booze that really sets Flood’s apart. And when the band kicks on, the place really starts to thumpin’. Precaution: Don't wear jeans and flip-flops.

The Fried Chicken King! Originated in Chicago in 1955. The taste is like southern cooking with a city appeal. The chicken, fish and shrimp are cooked to order. There are no warmers or heat lamps! Finish off your chicken with your choice of special sauce for a taste that's addictive and known as the 'Best Chicken in Detroit.' Two locations to serve you.
Heavenly Chicken & Waffles brings the delicious East Coast combination to metro Detroiters. A three-time feature on the Fox2 Morning Show, Heavenly Chicken & Waffles prepares fresh, made-to-order meals. The award-winning golden brown Belgian waffle is served alongside perfectly seasoned Amish chicken wings. Come and enjoy how it all began in a Harlem Renassaince atmosphere where good food and good times meet. Try this East Coast tradition that is delightfully different and heavenly satisfying. Can't make it to the restaurant? Ask about the "On the Spot" catering service.
36 total results

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