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Bombay distinguishes itself with the word “grille.” You can watch the process through a window in the dining room. Grilled items are prepared in tandoors, deep clay ovens heated by charcoal fires. Most Indian restaurants use gas, which is cheaper, but can’t produce the flavor of a charcoal fire. Seekh kabob — minced lamb cooked on a skewer — tastes nothing like the Middle Eastern variation called shish kafta, because of its rich spice blend. Chicken malai is marinated in yogurt and spices, then grilled. There are three vegetarian kebabs, some with paneer, a mild homemade farmer’s cheese. This is a great place for carnivores and vegetarians to commingle; the entrée menu is about evenly split between the two. Wine, beer and liquor are offered.
It’s a little more expensive than some Indian restaurants, with most meat entrées at $14 or $15 and most vegetarian ones at $10 or $11, but it has a full bar, including Indian beers and wines, and a quiet, cloth-napkin atmosphere. You get naan with your meal, so you’re saving $3 or $4 right there. Expect intense and multifaceted flavors and a very long menu — 111 dishes plus desserts. Most of the cuisine is northern, but they also feature a few Hyderabadi dishes. The lamb Hyderabadi is cooked in coconut milk and cream, with poppy seeds, so it’s creamy, as you’d expect, but with a kick that lifts it out of the ordinary. Some other dishes that you might not see every day are a sweet corn soup, Goan fish curry and bharwan simla mirch, which is a green pepper stuffed with paneer, potato, peas, cashews, cilantro and ginger, grilled on the tandoor using Sabharwal’s special recipe.
Imagine a restaurant where you can order one item from each category on the menu--appetizer, soup, entree (including bread, salad and side dish), fancy beverage and dessert--and spend only $10.70. Dishes are mouth-watering, an enticing mix of cool flavors and spicy ones, hot and warm temperatures, all fresh and flavorful. For mild, try lamb sagwala (with spinach); for hot, stuffed bhindi (okra and onions). Best bet: mango lassi (with buttermilk). Friendly, unpretentious, lots of Indian families. No alcohol. ****
"We serve South Indian, North Indian, Indo-Chinese and Mughalai cuisine. Our specialty is Indo-Chinese and Kerla cuisine."
A full service halal Pakistani/ Indian restaurant with vegetarian and non-vegetarian selections. We serve Indian food with its original recipe and flavor.

La-ziza's specialty is its tandoori, such as fish tandoori, chicken tandoori, and shish kebab. We also feature a famous weekday and weekend lunch buffet where you find carefully selected veggie and non-veggie dishes and very affordable lunch boxes. The veggie is only $3.95 and includes 3 vegetables with bread and rice, and the non-veggie is only $4.95 and includes 2 chicken items with bread and rice.

We also cater in-house parties with 15 items and unlimited soft drinks for only $12.75 and take-away catering starts at $5.95 for 7 items.

What a kick to discover you can get Indian street food in Michigan! There’s no street, of course — this is Michigan, and we try not to populate our streets unless we’re in our vehicles. Neehee’s is, in fact, selling street food in a strip mall, an irony that seems to bother the multitude of Indian families who flock there not at all.
Vegetarian and non-vegetarian Indian curry house. Tandoori (clay-oven) dishes served. Cozy atmosphere. Closed Monday.
Walking into Farmington Hills' Priya Restaurant & Bar, a sister restaurant to Priya in Troy, the Indian-style decoration and art make guests feel as though they actually are in India. Chef Sukhdev Singh specializes in various kinds of Indian dishes, but is especially talented with northern Indian dishes. His special palak daneer and chicken tikka masala are both popular. Owner Ravi Mandava recommends the chicken Shangri-La, masala dosa and tandoori chicken. Vegetarian dishes, such as vegetable masala and navratan koorma, are also good choices. A daily lunch buffet, featuring more than 13 items, is served between 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Bar, banquet rooms and dance floor are available.

Entrées at Rangoli come in small copper bowls. Among our favorites: nargisi aloo (a saucy, scooped-out potato stuffed with nuts, vegetables and cheese); chicken tikka masala (roasted breast meat in a thick and luscious sauce); spicy-hot chettinadu pepper chicken (fiery peppers in a coconut curry). Vegetarians can keep coming back for something new, with aloo gobi (potato cauliflower) recommended. If you’re new to Indian food, there are several combination dishes you can try, or come for the lunch buffet — you can’t beat the price: $8.45.

A vegetarian-friendly place featuring real tandoori cooking. Offering a daily lunch buffet.
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