You searched for:

Start over

Search for…

Narrow Search

38 results
On the corner of Commor and Conant streets, in the extraordinarily diverse city of Hamtramck, there is not one dish on Aladdin’s menu that surpasses $8.99. In fact, a large mixed fruit shake costs more than any of the appetizers and even a few of the vegetarian entrées that include rice or naan. On the whole, prices hardly surpass what you’ll pay for a meal at a national drive-through chain. Vegetarians have all sorts of choices, from curries to fried homemade cheese with spinach or green peas. There are some dishes where lentils are the base and others with chick peas. Try some mushroom vegetable fritters with onions and hot spices, or sautéed okra. The variety is amazing and the most expensive dish is $5.99. There are three times as many meat and seafood dishes. The goat korma, braised in a yogurt base is creamy, subtle, deep and rich, with a touch of spice heat. The gravy was so delicious we wiped the last little bit out of the bowl with crispy and chewy naan. Open 10:30 a.m.-midnight Sunday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Credit cards accepted; free delivery.
Bright colors, rich flavors, and exotic aromas. With more than 150 items on its menu, Ashoka wanders from the North to the South, with many legume-based recipes and fiery spice blends. There are even sections of the menu devoted to Indian-Chinese food, a style with a following in India. Also features a full-service bar and catering services.
Bombay distinguishes itself with the word “grille.” You can watch the process through a window in the dining room. Grilled items are prepared in tandoors, deep clay ovens heated by charcoal fires. Most Indian restaurants use gas, which is cheaper, but can’t produce the flavor of a charcoal fire. Seekh kabob — minced lamb cooked on a skewer — tastes nothing like the Middle Eastern variation called shish kafta, because of its rich spice blend. Chicken malai is marinated in yogurt and spices, then grilled. There are three vegetarian kebabs, some with paneer, a mild homemade farmer’s cheese. This is a great place for carnivores and vegetarians to commingle; the entrée menu is about evenly split between the two. Wine, beer and liquor are offered.
If you're going to Ann Arbor, the place for Indian food is Cardamom.
Your one-stop shop for cakes and pastries for all occassions. Specializing in custom orders, with no pre-made products. Every cake is made from scratch using only the finest fresh ingredients. You will be pleased with your cake, not just for it’s artistic design, but also for it’s delectable taste. We will also cater for special dietary requirements i.e. eggless cakes, organic ingredients, gluten free etc.
It’s a little more expensive than some Indian restaurants, with most meat entrées at $14 or $15 and most vegetarian ones at $10 or $11, but it has a full bar, including Indian beers and wines, and a quiet, cloth-napkin atmosphere. You get naan with your meal, so you’re saving $3 or $4 right there. Expect intense and multifaceted flavors and a very long menu — 111 dishes plus desserts. Most of the cuisine is northern, but they also feature a few Hyderabadi dishes. The lamb Hyderabadi is cooked in coconut milk and cream, with poppy seeds, so it’s creamy, as you’d expect, but with a kick that lifts it out of the ordinary. Some other dishes that you might not see every day are a sweet corn soup, Goan fish curry and bharwan simla mirch, which is a green pepper stuffed with paneer, potato, peas, cashews, cilantro and ginger, grilled on the tandoor using Sabharwal’s special recipe.
Imagine a restaurant where you can order one item from each category on the menu--appetizer, soup, entree (including bread, salad and side dish), fancy beverage and dessert--and spend only $10.70. Dishes are mouth-watering, an enticing mix of cool flavors and spicy ones, hot and warm temperatures, all fresh and flavorful. For mild, try lamb sagwala (with spinach); for hot, stuffed bhindi (okra and onions). Best bet: mango lassi (with buttermilk). Friendly, unpretentious, lots of Indian families. No alcohol. ****
Indian food with an emphasis on health.
"We serve South Indian, North Indian, Indo-Chinese and Mughalai cuisine. Our specialty is Indo-Chinese and Kerla cuisine."
Mix of southeast Asian food with Indian and Japanese offerings. Vegetarian friendly.
Cuisine from the tiny seaside Indian state of Goa.
38 total results

Best Things to Do In Detroit

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.