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A classic diner with modern, Detroit flair. Enjoy a '50s-style lunch at the counter or a modern cocktail after work. A full-service soda fountain pays tribute to the orginal five & dime shop that was once open in the Kresge building. All business lunches receive 10 percent off, Compuware and Quicken employees receive 15 percent off. Open late on Mondays and Tuesdays for an extended happy hour with complimentary appetizers and drink specials. Daily lunch specials, free WiFi.

A favorite watering hole for Detroit's newspeople, Red Wings fans and all types of metro Detroiters. They come for the atmosphere and stick around for the burgers and typical pub grub.
Both co-owners had Sicilian grandmothers, and both toiled in other people’s restaurants — for a total of 50 years — before making their dream come true. The experience shows, with Italian food (and some extras) at “prices that reflect the new reality” -- at least when it comes to the entrées and the wines. There are only three pasta dishes (four if you count the potato-and-flour gnocchi) and three pizzas. The sophisticated Italian menu is supplemented by some fabulous cured and smoked fish and meats as antipasti and by a few dishes that would be comfortable on any menu, such as New York strip, salmon and a pork chop. Also consider the fitting accompaniments: a pile of flaked Parmigiano-Reggiano with a bit of balsamic; a mound of watercress with a superior lemony dressing; a little metal cup of assorted olives; a puddle of grainy mustard. It’s all good. See the menu and the drinks list at angelinadetroit.com.
If “Musick has Charms to soothe a savage Breast” (William Congreve, 1697), food, too, will smooth savage passions or normal grumpiness brought on by hunger pangs. Sandwiches come with big, perfect steak fries. The Cuban is crunchy and filling, with lots of pickle. Appetizers are another way to go, with my favorite being the skewered coconut shrimp: light, crisp, just a tad sweet. Chicken or beef quesadillas are served with a creditable guacamole as well as salsa and sour cream, and Cuban black bean soup, a mix of whole beans and purée, has a vinegar kick. There’s only one dinner-type entrée per se on the menu — those same three lamb chops, but less interestingly presented, with rice and green beans — and a couple of desserts. To buy tickets to a Jazz Café show, call Music Hall or see Ticketmaster. Food is served from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and until 11 p.m. on weekends.
As at the majority of Thai restaurants in the area, the food at Bangkok Crossing is heavier than you might prefer. That said, several of the dishes are enjoyable: pla dook pad ped (crisp red snapper stir-fried with mushrooms, peppers and eggplant), pad ma kher (eggplant that’s fried within an inch of its life), as well as a few concessions to the American palate.
Michael Mina brings his steakhouse concept to Detroit with Bourbon Steak. Through his modern twist on a classic menu, lively, inviting bar and sophisticated, contemporary atmosphere, Bourbon Steak plays host to guests looking for the perfect fillet in a modern steakhouse setting.
Only one of Centaur's 13 menu drinks includes any gin, James Bond be damned. Harrington's trying to lure downtown business types who want a sophisticated setting for their after-work nip, and he’s pleased that patrons are a disparate lot, both in age and ethnicity.

"Upscale cuisine and service in comfortable, supper-club setting located in historic Gem and Century building. Spacious banquet facility; theater and dinner packages available."

Stepping into the newly restored art deco live jazz bar with an even more recently opened kitchen is to arrive in another era. Before the stage, the main area is separated into two spaces: One with round, candle-lit tables, the other, a stunning curved bar. All this sits below massive barrel-vaulted ceilings. All this ambience comes from pricey restoration work done in 2006 to make today’s Cliff Bell’s look like the Cliff Bell’s of 1935. That and the way they mix a cocktail. Neither cheap nor fast, mixed drinks are crafted old-school, more for taste than ease of production. With everything from a standard fillet of beef tenderloin to cassoulet, the French-inspired eclectic food menu speaks for itself. Try the duck confit on a buttermilk biscuit with cranberry jam for a small plate reduction of Thanksgiving dinner. Hedonists will go for a chunk of tender braised pork belly (otherwise known as bacon when cured and smoked) that comes plated with a rich, spicy sweet cider sauce, roasted fingerling potatoes and a pinch of cracklings for good measure.
Those who prefer the grape to the grain or even food to drink, should not be put off by the Detroit Beer Co.’s name. Like many “beer companies,” Detroit’s version on Broadway across from the Detroit Opera Theatre is more a full-service restaurant than a microbrewery, although it does offer a half-dozen unique quaffs. They have renovated downtown Detroit's century-old Hartz Building, and as many as 250 patrons could squeeze into the long narrow rooms, which include a spacious second floor devoted to nonsmokers and those who prefer an elevated view of Broadway. Along with such traditional pub grub as buffalo wings, nachos, quesadillas, burgers and pizza, the bar and grill offers a variety of dishes that transcend the genre, including generously portioned appetizers that emerge from their second-floor kitchen, such as seared, Cajun-seasoned chicken dippers, thoughtfully accompanied by a mildly sharp honey-mustard sauce ($8.50). Another appetizer worthy of dipping is silky-smooth hummus with warm pita ($6.95), though the otherwise respectable, tangy spinach and artichoke mélange may strike some as overly cheesy ($7.95). Several bean and cheese dips round out the starters.Entrée-sized salads average around $8 and range from Michigan cherry and Sante Fe chicken to barbecued-chicken chop. Cheese and beer dominate many of the entrées, most of which are slightly less than $10. All of this can be washed down by the Detroit Beer Co.’s splendid brews, best introduced by a tray of five-ounce samples of five of their finest ($6.50).
Yes, it's a bar, but it's also a grill worthy of this meat-and-potatoes town. The downtown spot packs 'em in for lunch. Expect solid bar fare, including big salads and a tasty chicken breast sandwich. The staff seems especially proud of their half-pound burger, the "house special," draped with enough meat and cheese to bring tears to a vegan's eyes, including ham, bacon, American and Swiss, served with fries and a mug of beer or a pop. Open 11 a.m.-2 a.m. daily, except Sundays, which vary.
28 total results

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