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Family owned restaurant, bar and banquet facility.

The bar is one of Birmingham's favorite watering holes, the dining room in the back slightly less frantic at this brightly reworked circa-1932 building where chef Jack Leone has done wonders for the menu. Now colorful contemporary dishes, typified by angelhair pasta with chicken, tomatoes, white beans and artichokes, stuffed tenderloin and linguine with shrimp, spinach and lemon, and some great Italian salads make the food live up to the witty decor which pays homage to the light bulb. A separate, downstairs room called Edison's offers live jazz, its own menu of light dishes, and upscale drinks like martinis and champagne in the evening, Thursday through Saturday.
Enjoy casual dining and creative cuisine such as steak, seafood and pasta in a relaxed atmosphere. Includes an extensive wine list, upstairs balcony dining, and vegetarian friendly selections.
The Book Cadillac’s 24 Grille is a less formal, though no less expensive, alternative to the acclaimed meat-eaters’ paradise in the hotel’s opposite corner, Roast. It has a somewhat shorter, American menu, with just a couple of steaks and four seafood dishes. 24 Grille says that its ingredients are preservative-free and sourced locally when possible. As at many places these days, 24’s calamari are crisp and wonderful, served with capers, lemon beurre blanc and chili aioli. The dressings make the dish. The melt-in-your-mouth scallops, sweet and smoky and served with clams in the shell, are excellent. For vegetarians, there are Himalayan cabbage rolls, stuffed with grilled tofu, mushrooms and some nutty Himalayan red rice. And delicious veal meatloaf comes as a tall tower — layers of meatloaf and bacon, interwoven with layers of potato purée. 24 Grille also has a happy hour from 4 to 6 on weekdays, when wine and appetizers are half off.
For many diners, the lack of a liquor license is a deal-breaker. That proclivity can relegate most Middle Eastern spots to a lunchtime treat rather than an evening pleasure. Farmington Hills’ 2Booli addresses the problem with not only a full bar but a happy hour that lasts all evening long, Monday through Friday. Draughts are $2.50, margaritas and martinis are $4, and featured wines of the week are also about $4, or $12-$15 a bottle. As the name makes clear, the restaurant has aspirations to address several cultures around the Mediterranean, rather than just the Lebanon from which the owners’ parents emigrated. Bruschetta, polenta, fritto misto, clam linguine, and a meatball sub share the menu with tabbouleh and falafel.
Upscale sports bar and grill located on the northwest corner of Telegraph and 12 Mile in the heart of Southfield. Features 7 high definition big screens to catch the game on.
At dinnertime, there’s just one way to order: the all-you-can-eat meat-and-vegetable platter for $16.90 per person or the vegetarian platter for $14.90. Patrons of the Blue Nile, Taste of Ethiopia or Windsor’s Marathon are familiar with the routine: Little heaps of fabulous dishes are placed on a giant circle of spongy injera bread, which everyone shares. More injera is alongside, folded like napkins, to use as your eating utensil until you’re ready to eat the tablecloth. At lunchtime, you can keep the meal smaller and order one meat with two vegetables for $7.95. But what makes Addis Ababa different from other Ethiopian restaurants is that it has a take-out menu. Twelve ounces of the vegetable dishes are $2.95, meat $3.75, injera free. You could create your own feast at home or for a picnic. It’s open every evening and for lunch Tuesday through Saturday.
On the corner of Commor and Conant streets, in the extraordinarily diverse city of Hamtramck, there is not one dish on Aladdin’s menu that surpasses $8.99. In fact, a large mixed fruit shake costs more than any of the appetizers and even a few of the vegetarian entrées that include rice or naan. On the whole, prices hardly surpass what you’ll pay for a meal at a national drive-through chain. Vegetarians have all sorts of choices, from curries to fried homemade cheese with spinach or green peas. There are some dishes where lentils are the base and others with chick peas. Try some mushroom vegetable fritters with onions and hot spices, or sautéed okra. The variety is amazing and the most expensive dish is $5.99. There are three times as many meat and seafood dishes. The goat korma, braised in a yogurt base is creamy, subtle, deep and rich, with a touch of spice heat. The gravy was so delicious we wiped the last little bit out of the bowl with crispy and chewy naan. Open 10:30 a.m.-midnight Sunday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Credit cards accepted; free delivery.
Amadeus is a unique restaurant designed after the old-world cafes of Vienna. A variety of traditional dishes from Central Europe are offered, as well as desserts and a unique list of wines and beers. Enjoy candlelit dinners and live classical music on the weekends. Family owned and operated for almost 20 years.
Amici’s Pizza fans in Berkley, Southfield and Birmingham now have their favorite gourmet pizza closer at hand. In addition to takeout and delivery service, the new Amici’s has a small sit-down dining area, freshly painted in warm, fresco-like colors. Free pizza samples are often distributed while you wait for your order. Owner George Stark stresses that Amici’s uses only the freshest ingredients for its long list of specialty pizza toppings, from artichoke hearts to roasted garlic and fontina cheese. Vegan combos and tofu cheese are also on the menu. The tomato sauce is made with fresh herbs, hand-stripped from the stem. Stark says Amici’s goes through four pounds of fresh thyme and 40 pounds of freshly roasted garlic each week. They prepare 15 specialty combinations, including the customer favorite — blackened chicken with scallions, Monterey Jack cheese and tomato-herb sauce — or you can build your own, on traditional or whole wheat crust. All pizzas are topped with Amici’s signature fresh herb sprig. Amici’s also serves salads with homemade dressings, soft breadsticks, specialty sandwiches and lasagna.
Pastas $18-$29, entrées $18-$35
A favorite watering hole for Detroit's newspeople, Red Wings fans and all types of metro Detroiters. They come for the atmosphere and stick around for the burgers and typical pub grub.
The new Andiamo complex on Grand River’s Main Street in Novi.
Both co-owners had Sicilian grandmothers, and both toiled in other people’s restaurants — for a total of 50 years — before making their dream come true. The experience shows, with Italian food (and some extras) at “prices that reflect the new reality” -- at least when it comes to the entrées and the wines. There are only three pasta dishes (four if you count the potato-and-flour gnocchi) and three pizzas. The sophisticated Italian menu is supplemented by some fabulous cured and smoked fish and meats as antipasti and by a few dishes that would be comfortable on any menu, such as New York strip, salmon and a pork chop. Also consider the fitting accompaniments: a pile of flaked Parmigiano-Reggiano with a bit of balsamic; a mound of watercress with a superior lemony dressing; a little metal cup of assorted olives; a puddle of grainy mustard. It’s all good. See the menu and the drinks list at angelinadetroit.com.
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