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It’s a little more expensive than some Indian restaurants, with most meat entrées at $14 or $15 and most vegetarian ones at $10 or $11, but it has a full bar, including Indian beers and wines, and a quiet, cloth-napkin atmosphere. You get naan with your meal, so you’re saving $3 or $4 right there. Expect intense and multifaceted flavors and a very long menu — 111 dishes plus desserts. Most of the cuisine is northern, but they also feature a few Hyderabadi dishes. The lamb Hyderabadi is cooked in coconut milk and cream, with poppy seeds, so it’s creamy, as you’d expect, but with a kick that lifts it out of the ordinary. Some other dishes that you might not see every day are a sweet corn soup, Goan fish curry and bharwan simla mirch, which is a green pepper stuffed with paneer, potato, peas, cashews, cilantro and ginger, grilled on the tandoor using Sabharwal’s special recipe.
Every Monday - open mic night. Every Tuesday - 18 Rabbit. Every Wednesday- Karaoke with Chris Green. Every Sunday - Service industry night.
With four tables and four booths, this narrow eatery can handle around 30 customers at one time. Although the setting is diner-plain, the Korean cuisine is authentic, making few compromises for the American palate. Garlic is a key ingredient in at least half of the aromatic dishes from Hankuk’s kitchen. More than half of the menu items are either soups or preparations in broth. For example, duk-mandoo-guk is beef broth overflowing with scores of dumplings, rice cakes, beef, bits of egg yolk, green onion and garlic. The Korean fish stew is composed of large chunks of fish, small crab legs and squid, along with vegetables, red-pepper paste and garlic. Soybean-paste soup, buckwheat vermicelli in cold soup, and Japanese-style noodle soup all are available in their pure vegetarian state.
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