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  • Issue of
  • Aug 15-21, 2001
  • Vol. 21, No. 44

News & Views

  • Fash, flash & MASH
  • Columns
  • Fash, flash & MASH

    Passing by the glitzy Fash Bash to take in the cultural feast at the detroit contemporary (art and music from Trailer Bride, Blanche and the Filter Kings) ... Get-well wishes for Wendy Case ... Good food coming to the Ren Cen? ... & more.
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Arts & Culture

  • Head music manifesto
  • Culture
  • Head music manifesto

    Few artists have pushed the boundaries and possibilities of sampling as much as London's Matthew Herbert. Herbert refuses to sample others' music; instead he takes sounds from his personal life.
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  • The Scene
  • Greenfingers

    American director Joel Hershman (Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me) has taken the seeds of an unusual real-life phenomenon — British prisoners competing in prestigious gardening shows — and grown a lovely tale of one man (Clive Owen) blossoming through horticulture.
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  • The Scene
  • Rush Hour 2

    Rush Hour 2’s story line pulls Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker through scenes and set pieces that showcase their skills — Chan’s unbelievable gymnastic agility and acting chops, Tucker’s newfound martial arts prowess and his loud mouth — but it ignorantly perpetuates stereotypes that the first movie challenged.
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  • The Scene
  • Apocalypse Now Redux

    Watching Apocalypse Now Redux is like watching the original big-budget two-and-a-half-hour blockbuster art film with a few digressions thrown in (nearly 50 minutes of additional, nonessential footage), some interesting, some curious, one long and seriously miscalculated.
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  • The Scene
  • The Road Home

    Zhang Yimou's film is a simple love story of a universal type, a folk tale with a leisurely pace and a foregone conclusion. This could all be terribly sentimental, but it's redeemed by a truly captivating performance by Zhang Ziyi (who was Jen in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon).
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Food & Drink

  • Table and Bar
  • Family fusion

    Head chef Michael Lum says it best: "The idea is Asian-based, new-American cooking. It's traditional American cooking with Asian spices to give it a new flavor." Lum's extended family help in the kitchen and elsewhere: an uncle makes fresh noodles and Lum's wife creates sushi and other appetizers. Spotlight dishes include the duck Macao (marinated in spices, deep-fried, then coated with a spicy Asian sauce) and tomato soup (a thick broth with crispy sizzling rice, Chinese veggies and big chunks of chicken and shrimp).
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Music

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