Events starting Dec. 13 in Ann Arbor

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Yourist Studio Gallery Holiday Show and Sale

Fri., Dec. 13, 5-8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 14, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 15, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

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See Nancy Bulkley's captivating cat vases and more exceptional ceramic art at our 2019 Holiday Show and Sale, where we're featuring the best work from our resident artists and selected students. And, as is our custom, we're presenting it all in a gala atmosphere with great company, tasty food and drink, and lots of seasonal conviviality. Join us for our festive Preview Sale and Artists' Reception on Friday, December 13, 5-8 pm. The sale continues on Saturday, December 14, 10 am-6 pm and on Sunday, December 15, 11 am-5 pm. 734-662-4914

Exhibition: "Pan-African Pulp: A Commission by Meleko Mokgosi"

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m.


In Pan-African Pulp, Botswana-born artist Meleko Mokgosi explores the history of Pan-Africanism, the global movement to unite ethnic groups of sub-Saharan African descent. His Vertical Gallery installation, which inaugurates a new biennial commission program at UMMA, features large-scale panels inspired by African photo novels of the 1960s and ’70s, a mural examining the complexity of blackness, posters from Pan-African movements from around the world, including those founded in Detroit and Africa in the 1960s, and stories from Setswana literature. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Collection Ensemble" (April 2, 2019–ongoing)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m.


"Collection Ensemble" presents the first major reinstallation of UMMA's iconic entry space in over a decade. It exchanges Alumni Memorial Hall's previous focus on European and American painting for a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media, sampling the Museum's remarkable, disparate holdings. Featuring works of art by numerous famous and not-so-famous artists, many of them artists of color and women—including Charles Alston, Christo, Theaster Gates, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Do-Ho Suh, Kara Walker, and others, "Collection Ensemble" reimagines the collection. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Reflections: An Ordinary Day" (November 16, 2019–May 10, 2020)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 10


UMMA’s second exhibition of Inuit art derived from the Power Family’s generous promised gift to the Museum in 2018 explores the relationship between the artist and the representation of everyday experiences. Through a selection of mid-century to contemporary Inuit prints, drawings, and sculptures that portray seemingly ordinary reflections of daily life along with daydreaming meditations, the exhibition bridges the mundane and the fantastic. "Reflections: An Ordinary Day" takes visitors on a lyrical journey of the myriad spaces and routines within an Arctic landscape. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Take Your Pick: Collecting Found Photographs" (September 21, 2019–February 23, 2020)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 23


Come help build our collection of “ordinary” American 20th-century photographs. "Take Your Pick" invites you—the Museum’s visitors—to select photographs for our permanent collection. What belongs in a permanent collection, and why? Who and what should be represented, and how should we decide? This exhibition considers these questions in regard to 1,000 amateur photographs on loan from the private collection of Peter J. Cohen, who has gathered more than 60,000 snapshots while exploring flea markets in the United States and Europe over two decades. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Mari Katayama" (October 12, 2019–January 26, 2020)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 26


Japanese artist Mari Katayama (born 1987) features her own body in a provocative series of works combining photography, sculpture, and textile. Born with a developmental condition, the artist had both her legs amputated at the age of nine and has worn prosthetics ever since. In order to fill a deep gap between her own understanding of self and physicality, and contemporary society’s simplistic categorizations, Katayama began to explore her identity by objectifying her body in her art. In photographs she assumes different personas, dressed in revealing lingerie in private, domestic spaces or in dramatic waterscapes. Her first solo US show. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Copies and Invention in East Asia" (August 17, 2019–January 5, 2020)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 5


Far from being frowned upon as uncreative, in China, Korea, and Japan, copying has long been considered a valuable practice. Through works of art spanning ancient to contemporary times, "Copies and Invention in East Asia" challenges our understanding of originality, and presents copying as an act of imaginative interpretation. The exhibition includes burial goods that conjure a world for the deceased; Buddhist sculptures produced in multiples to amplify religious experience and meaning; paintings in which a master’s brushstrokes are faithfully duplicated as a way of shaping the self; and contemporary works that address multiplicity and duplication in the modern world. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Exhibition: "Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s" (June 8, 2019–February 9, 2020)

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 9


In the midst of the political and cultural upheavals of the 60s and 70s, artists, critics, and the public grappled with the relationship between art, politics, race, and feminism. During these decades, the notion that abstraction was a purely formal and American art form, concerned only with timeless themes disconnected from the present, was met with increased skepticism. Women artists and artists of color began to actively and assertively explore abstraction’s possibilities. Their new formal and intellectual strategies—seen here across large-scale and miniature work—dramatically transformed the practice of abstraction in the 1960s and 1970s in a politically shifting American landscape. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

FREE BAND CONCERT: The Art of the Holidays

Fri., Dec. 13, 7:30-9 p.m.
Towsley Auditorium Morris Lawrence Bldg, Washtenaw Community College, Ann Arbor Greater Ann Arbor Area


FREE CONCERT: The 80-piece Washtenaw Community Concert Band rings in the holiday season with musical tributes to the rich traditions of this special time of year. Join the band as we bring our art to unwrap some of your favorite holiday tunes. Dr. Christopher Heidenreich, Conductor and Music Director. Free parking. Refreshments will be served. Towsley Auditorium at Washtenaw Community College, 4800 E Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (734) 252-9221

Ebird & Friends Holiday Show

Thu., Dec. 12, 8-10 p.m., Fri., Dec. 13, 8-10 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 14, 3-5 & 8-10 p.m.
The Ark 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor Downtown Ann Arbor

Buy Tickets$25


Led by dynamic, multi-instrumentalist songwriter Erin Zindle, this special, unique variety-show is different every year, showcasing a creative approach to holiday music and original tunes from a wide range of genres and traditions. Many of our amazingly talented friends join us onstage for each performance including Alex Holycross (The Native Howl), Graham Parsons (The Go Rounds), Carolyn Striho, Anne Heaton, Mark Lavengood, Jen Sygit, Brad Phillips, Ross Huff, Tim Haldeman, Shelly Smith, Jenny Jones, and more! General admission tickets remain; reserved and gold circle section are sold out for all nights. Act fast! 734-761-1800

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