Art Exhibition Events in Downtown Ann Arbor

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Free tour: Collection Ensemble

Sun., Aug. 25, 2-3 p.m.


The reinstallation of UMMA’s Apse, called “Collection Ensemble,” highlights the breadth and variety of the Museum’s collection and juxtaposes works of art from different artists, periods, areas, and media. The installation is organized around a very large photograph of a Baroque church by Candida Höfer. From this centerpiece, the works of art are grouped in scenes or distinctive vignettes comprised of a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media. Join a docent to explore and interpret this exciting new project. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

In Conversation: Contemporary Inuit Art: An Artistic and Cultural Phenomenon

Sun., Aug. 25, 3-4 p.m.

Buy Ticketsfree but registration required


"Tillirnanngittuq" (pronounced “tid-ee-nang-ee-took” and meaning “unexpected”) is UMMA’s first exhibition to showcase The Power Family Program for Inuit Art and presents 34 engaging sculptures and 24 striking prints. Contemporary Inuit art first gained public attention in the 1950s and quickly attracted international acclaim for both its cultural interest and its artistic strength. Join guest curator Mame Jackson for an overview of this fascinating history and for a discussion of the traditional cultural values and “world view” of the Inuit as revealed in time-honored Inuit legends and expressed in Inuit art. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free talk: Boltanski, Monument to the Lycée Chases

Sun., Sept. 8, 2-3 p.m.


M"onument to the Lycée Chases" is part of a series of works Boltanski began in 1987, inspired by a found photograph of the 1931 graduating class from a private Jewish high school in Vienna, Austria. His re-photographed images are mere silhouettes or intimations of corporal presences that together comprise a moving meditation on loss and endurance. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: Collection Ensemble

Sun., Sept. 15, 2-3 p.m.


The reinstallation of UMMA’s Apse, called “Collection Ensemble,” highlights the breadth and variety of the Museum’s collection and juxtaposes works of art from different artists, periods, areas, and media. The installation is organized around a very large photograph of a Baroque church by Candida Höfer. From this centerpiece, the works of art are grouped in scenes or distinctive vignettes comprised of a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media. Join a docent to explore and interpret this exciting new project. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

In Conversation: Copies and Multiplications in Buddhism

Sun., Sept. 15, 3-4 p.m.

Buy Ticketsfree but registration required


The act of producing copies has a special meaning in Buddhism. From simply reciting and rewriting Buddha’s teachings to creating multiple images of sacred Buddhist figures, objects and texts, or the commissioning of one million pagodas, copying served to increase karmic merit—​guaranteeing a better afterlife and eventually leading to enlightenment. In this conversation, Kevin Carr, Associate Professor of Japanese Art History at University of Michigan and specialist of Buddhist art, and Natsu Oyobe, UMMA Curator of Asian Art, will guide us through Buddhist art objects featured in the current UMMA exhibition "Copies and Invention in East Asia." (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq

Sun., Sept. 22, 2-3 p.m.


In celebration of UMMA’s new Power Family Program for Inuit Art, the Museum presents a special exhibition of two incredible, intertwining stories. One traces the development of contemporary Inuit art in the Canadian Arctic from the 1950s to the present. The other relates the fascinating story of the Power family’s important role in supporting and promoting Inuit art from the outset, bringing public attention to its artistic strength and cultural importance. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: Copies and Invention in East Asia

Sun., Sept. 29, 2-3 p.m.


The act of producing copies has a special meaning in Buddhism. From simply reciting and rewriting Buddha’s teachings to creating multiple images of sacred Buddhist figures, objects and texts, or the commissioning of one million pagodas, copying served to increase karmic merit—​guaranteeing a better afterlife and eventually leading to enlightenment. In this conversation, Kevin Carr, Associate Professor of Japanese Art History at University of Michigan and specialist of Buddhist art, and Natsu Oyobe, UMMA Curator of Asian Art, will guide us through Buddhist art objects featured in the current UMMA exhibition "Copies and Invention in East Asia." (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: "Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s"

Sun., Oct. 6, 2-3 p.m.


The artworks in "Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s" demonstrate both radical and disarming changes in how artists worked and what they thought their art was about. Their new formal and intellectual strategies—seen here across large-scale and miniature work—dramatically transformed the practice of abstraction in the 1960s and 1970s in a politically shifting American landscape. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

In Conversation: The Dialogues of Collection Ensemble

Sun., Oct. 6, 3-4 p.m.

Buy Ticketsfree but registration required


"Collection Ensemble" is the first major reinstallation of UMMA's historic entry space in over a decade. Join Vera Grant, UMMA’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, and curator of "Collection Ensemble, "for a discussion of how the vignettes may work in a variety of ways, and how art museums are rethinking their collection displays, in ways that demonstrate art’s powerful capacities and connections. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Take Your Pick: Collecting Found Photographs

Sun., Oct. 13, 2-3 p.m.


Join a docent on a journey through time and memory, as you explore over 1,000 found photographs together. "Take Your Pick" invites you—the Museum’s visitors—to select photographs for our permanent collection. What belongs in a permanent collection, and why? Who and what should be represented, and how should we decide? (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: Collection Ensemble

Sun., Oct. 20, 2-3 p.m.


The reinstallation of UMMA’s Apse, called “Collection Ensemble” highlights the breadth and variety of the Museum’s collection and juxtaposes works of art from different artists, periods, areas, and media. The installation is organized around a very large photograph of a Baroque church by Candida Höfer. From this centerpiece, the works of art are grouped in scenes or distinctive vignettes comprised of a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

Free tour: "The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq"

Sun., Oct. 27, 2-3 p.m.


In celebration of UMMA’s new Power Family Program for Inuit Art, the Museum presents a special exhibition of two incredible, intertwining stories. One traces the development of contemporary Inuit art in the Canadian Arctic from the 1950s to the present. The other relates the fascinating story of the Power family’s important role in supporting and promoting Inuit art from the outset, bringing public attention to its artistic strength and cultural importance. (734) 764-0395; (734) 764-3731 (FAX)

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