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124 results
    • Ode to soup

        Forté presents a menu full of magical combinations -- complex, rich flavors served with style. Every dish our reviewer tried was splendid, and the dessert tray looks like a work of art.
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    • A long strange trip

        The food and drinks are American classics, formulaic but entirely edible. Lots of things are fried, everything is well-prepared, nothing pushes the envelope. Portions are generous.
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    • Building better burritos

        Modeled after taco stands popular in the southwest, this tiny Royal Oak spot is packed with plenty of energy. The entrées are familiar: burritos, tacos, quesadillas and tacons (a fried tortilla folded into a cone). But add in choices of meats: Mexican beef or chicken (a stewed variety), grilled chicken or steak, Baja-style fish fillet (a mild whitefish fried in a beer batter) or ground beef, along with beans and rice or veggies, then add in your choice of toppings.
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    • Sky-high caramel-apple pie

        Lunch options include "philly bello" sandwiches and shrimp burgers, while the dinner menu offers dishes such as chicken scallopini and pasta aioli. Desserts are the highlight, especially the caramel-apple pie.
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    • East side treasure

        The Kingdom Men’s Café, which opened in October 2002, is a project of the East Lake Baptist Church. The food is equal to many other soul food restaurants, but it costs less, your plate sits on linen tablecloths and the service is fastidious. The menu follows a standard formula among soul food restaurants: entrées, sides, cornbread and dessert. Entrées include baked and fried chicken, catfish and fried and smothered pork chops.
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    • Gastronomic dream

        Chef and co-owner Kipp Bourdeau has opened his own dream restaurant, but we diners are the lucky ones. Starter courses are elegant and creative (don't skip the onion soup). Pork chops with Calvados cream sauce, jambalaya pasta, maple-cured salmon ... none of the entrées disappointed, and the prices are quite reasonable. It's not easy to make room for dessert, but you should definitely make an effort.
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    • Still quite a catch

        Desserts, especially the peach cobbler, are some of the best features of this upscale yet casual fish place. Try the warm chocolate cake with ganache if you've got time to wait -- it takes 17 minutes to prepare. Other excellent dishes include the salads, bouillabaisse and roast pork loin. A lower-priced lunch menu makes it an affordable treat.
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    • Making it look simple

        As Maxine’s the modest surroundings were trumped by the terrific food. It was the kind of restaurant you weren’t sure you wanted to talk about — maybe you wouldn’t be able to get a table on a weekend evening. The remodeled restaurant is more elegant, spacious, comfortable and relaxing, but the most coveted seats are still the stools that pull up to the marble counter surrounding the open kitchen where diners can watch the theater that is cooking as an art.
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    • Mussel worship

        The concept is Belgian brewpub and the atmosphere is totally unpretentious, quirky and interesting. Belgian food is heavily influenced by Germany and France, and some of Bastone’s menu items are quintessential Belgian, such as moule (mussels), brandade de morue (puree of salt cod, potatoes and olive oil, a staple of the poor for centuries) and twice-fried Belgian frites served with mayonnaise.
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    • Family tradition

        Situated in Detroit's historic West Village, Misha's has a warm, welcoming atmosphere. Chef/owner Lillie Howard serves most of the entrées fried, grilled or sautéed — your choice. If you've never seen up close what "falling-off-the-bones tender" looks like, you'll see it in Misha's ribs. Portions are generous, and the barbecue sauce is nice and spicy. But the key to soul food is the sides, and there are all the standards here, and then some.
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    • Seaweed-wrapped gems

        Sushi chef Simon Bennett cheerfully shares his enthusiasm as he explains menu items or guides a newcomer in a beginner's assortment. The sushi comes in three categories: Nigiri, Rolls and Inside-Out. Especially important when you're eating raw fish: The restaurant scored 100 percent in its health department inspection.
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    • Hidden Italian delight

        Manager Dean Cicala describes La Dolce Vita as “a little hidden jewel that people are happy to find here.” Sometimes it is simplicity itself that makes a dish. Pasta dishes range from $12-$19. Main courses include too many chicken options, too few veal, two beef, and only one fish option. The gems on the dessert tray are made by Denise Rosselli, and focus on chocolate. There are also sorbets, if you’re looking for something lighter. Now that warm weather has settled in, an inviting little courtyard awaits behind an wrought iron fence to offer al fresco dinning.
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    • Aquatic food chain

        Mitchell’s Fish Market is a member of that new breed of restaurants: the upscale chain. Featuring an ice-filled display case with luscious steaks and bright fillets, the selection of fish varies from day to day. You choose the fish and its style of preparation. The experience is up and down.
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    • Primo pasta

        These adjoining restaurants serve robust Italian food made of fine ingredients. The Cook’s Shop specializes in tableside cooking — anything that can be flambéed is, and this can be lots of fun to watch. The family-style salad is tossed with big croutons and a wondrous, better-than-Caesar dressing. The egg and semolina pasta is made in-house, which may explain why it tastes so good no matter what sauce is on it. Don't skip the pasta appetizers, and try the sublime cherries flambé (served with vanilla ice cream) for dessert.
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    • Malt shop classics

        Comet Burger's concept of the '50s is pink vinyl and stainless steel chairs, Formica tabletops decorated with little boomerangs (you'll recognize them when you see them), album covers on the walls, lots of TVs, and, of course, sliders and malts. The malts alone are worth the trip. As for the sliders, they're sliders, but grilled onions improve the flavor considerably.
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    • The sizzle, not the steak

        Inn Season Café — a rare provider of vegetarian cuisine in metro Detroit — has gotten better as it has gotten older. Fine, organic ingredients have always been its hallmark, but the health food nature of the cooking has been eclipsed; now you are eating vegetarian haute cuisine.
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    • Primo pasta

        These adjoining restaurants serve robust Italian food made of fine ingredients. The Cook’s Shop specializes in tableside cooking — anything that can be flambéed is, and this can be lots of fun to watch. The family-style salad is tossed with big croutons and a wondrous, better-than-Caesar dressing. The egg and semolina pasta is made in-house, which may explain why it tastes so good no matter what sauce is on it. Don't skip the pasta appetizers, and try the sublime cherries flambé (served with vanilla ice cream) for dessert.
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    • Workweek fare

        Other entrées include fettuccine Alfredo, fish and chips (made with whitefish instead of the usual cod), mesquite-grilled shrimp, grilled ham steak (with fresh pineapple and golden raisins in a coconut butter), grilled chicken breast with chili mole, and, of course, steak. Hamburgers are made from sirloin steak, ground right in the kitchen.
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    • Tamed flames

        Feeding its Livonia neighborhood for more than 10 years, this is a busy little place, but the staff is friendly and attentive. Authenticity has been subjugated to American tastes; fiery Szechuan specialties are toned down and interspersed with milder Cantonese entrées. Best bets include the Mandarin crispy duck and that old standby, moo goo gai pan (slabs of chicken breast sautéed with snow peas, bamboo shoots and mushrooms in a simple white sauce).
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    • Beyond waffle fries

        There is a difference between a sports bar and a restaurant. Champps falls in between. For a sports bar, Champps offers an extensive menu that goes way beyond burgers and waffle fries.
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    • Faves & surprises

        Proprietor Sameer Eid has been serving meticulously prepared mideastern food to the locals since 1970. He knows his way around the market and the kitchen, and gives a more sophisticated spin to the well-known litany of shish kebab, shish kafta, baked kibbee and lamb chops. Seafood dishes are also specialties.
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    • Happy family

        An unusually homey setting for a Japanese restaurant, the prices are a bargain. The $13.50 combination dinner includes a bowl of miso soup, a salad (American-style), a California roll, chicken teriyaki made with breast meat, two shrimp tempura and an assortment of vegetable tempura, rice and dessert. Offers half a dozen noodle soups, including udon, rice noodles and egg noodles (ramen) dessert is often bread pudding served with a creamy vanilla sauce, swirled with chocolate.
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    • Now that’s kosher

        Located inside the Jewish Community Center, Milk and Honey is a gourmet restaurant that just happens to be kosher. The menu is seafood and vegetarian, and the food is as good and as varied as at any comparable restaurant. Our reviewer loved the lusciously red ahi tuna and the pistachio-crusted sea bass, both perfectly prepared. The selection of vegetarian entrées is enough to rejuvenate the diet of even lifelong vegetarians, and some of the menu items are so good, you won't be able to resist them on a return visit.
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    • Eat the house

        Think of the food court at your local mall. Now ratchet up several notches, because everything is done to excess in casino-land. There are 10 food stations: The American Grill, The Bayou, The Wok (a miniature Mongolian barbecue), Mexican Fiesta, soul food, Italian, and a salad bar, coffee bar, ice cream bar and dessert bar.
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