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    • Greektown goes global

        The menu was culled from major world cuisines — Asian, Mediterranean, French, South American, Caribbean and more. It’s fusion food, with Mediterranean given the most influence. Entrees include the expected salmon and lobster, steaks and skinless, boneless chicken, as well as king crab legs, braised lamb shank, Alaskan halibut and Asiago-encrusted New York strip with basil and garlic
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    • All in the family

        One of the triumvirate of the area's classic, old-line Italian-American restaurants (Mario's, Lelli's, Larco's) with roots that go back half a century to Detroit's Six Mile Road. Pastas and steaks in generous portions are equally emphasized in an upbeat setting featuring black-and-white photographs of Italian gardens.
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    • Perfect pescatore pasta

        Cozy tables and flickering candles lend themselves to a warm atmosphere. Remember to convert to U.S. funds before you decide to pass up something due to the price. When you walk down Erie Street in Windsor's Little Italy, there are so many restaurants, it's hard to know where to stop. Now you know.
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    • Freshening up your Italian

        A modest place in a suburban strip mall, it doesn’t have the most extensive menu, or the cheapest prices, but what’s there is very good.These classic dishes can be found in most Italian eateries, but here they are just a little bit better. Ravioli, made fresh daily, is served with a bright orange palomino sauce that comes from mixing tomato sauce with cream. The same sauce appears on the gnocchi cappricciosa — perfect little potato dumplings, light as pillows, which the sauce doesn’t overwhelm. A frequently appearing special is angel hair pasta with lovely grilled shrimp and plenty of fresh vegetables, including spinach, onions and tomatoes.
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    • Familiar friends

        Every neighborhood should have a Jennifer’s Café: good food and reasonable prices on anything from a salad or a sandwich to an elaborate dinner. Twenty varieties of sandwiches are offered, most wrapped in a thin pita. Chicken, veal and fish predominate on the menu (although the beef tenderloin tips are outstanding), and dinner comes with soup or salad. There are also several Middle Eastern selections and a reasonably priced dessert menu.
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    • Legendary deli hangout

        Lou's has a friendly atmosphere where everyone seems comfortable. Diners can select from 41 different sandwiches with names such as Sherry’s Schtick (triple-decker of salami, coleslaw, Russian dressing), Felicia’s Chutzpa (triple-decker of ham, pineapple, cream cheese, lettuce, mayo), and Leo’s Yolk (two fried eggs, beef bacon, mayo). Open until 2 a.m. on weekdays, 4 a.m. on weekends.
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    • Color, flavor & fire

        Bright colors, rich flavors, exotic aromas. With more than 150 items on its menu, Ashoka wanders from the North to the South, with more legume-based recipes and fiery spice blends. There are even sections of the menu devoted to Indian-Chinese food, a style with a following in India. Full-service bar.
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    • Bringing back Bonnie

        The “kitchen” here is a place where you can eat in for lunch or take out dinner or just stop by for cappuccino and a piece of one of the memorable pastries. Point to what you’d like from their refrigerated display cases and pay by the pound. A place where carnivores, vegetarians and vegans can dine in harmony. Desserts are a point of pride. Open daily except Sunday. Closes at 7 p.m., 6 p.m. on Saturday.
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    • Family Thai

        Rexy’s is an upscale version of a successful formula. The interior is interesting and elegant, with a saltwater fish tank and bold, tropical murals. For an appetizer, try koong houm pa ($6.50), large shrimp stuffed with minced pork, ensconced in a paper-thin wrapper, then briefly fried. Served with a sugary-sweet plum sauce, it's a lovely beginning. With most of the entrées, you can select your protein: chicken, beef, pork, tofu, shrimp, scallops or squid.
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    • Snappy tapas

        Spanish cuisine is underrepresented in the metro Detroit area, making Sangria most welcome. The featured dishes, tapas and paella, require a leisurely schedule. With a pitcher of sangria and a good friend, you have the ingredients for an enjoyable evening.
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    • Fine fresh French

        Grapevine-wrapped pillars, classical background music and jeweled murals. Entrees prepared to order. Vegetable broth-based French onion soup, bay scallops poached in vermouth. Warm salad of duck confit and lobster. Pastries are beautiful to behold.
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    • Tried and trendy

        The unpretentious exterior looks like a pancake house; it's crowded and noisy inside. All the attention has gone into the superlative food, which includes roasted wild mushrooms with peppercorn boursin, salad of warm tomato slices with chevre and red and yellow peppers, whitefish with tomato-ginger-cashew chutney, mahi-mahi with black bean, corn and tomato sauce. On weekends, there's a brunch menu till 4 pm. With no reservations taken, eager customers wait in line day and night, and are happy to do so.
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    • Light, lovely pierogis

        Ferndale is so fashionable that hip eateries are spilling over east of Woodward. Christine's Cuisine, the namesake of chef Christine Adams, is a casual, comfortable place to dine. The "cuisine" in this restaurant's title is appropriate because the intent is ambitious; there's an emphasis on the homemade, and there are plenty of hits among a few misses.
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    • Savory Spanish holiday

        Authentic Flamenco over dinners of tapas and paella, all in your local Holiday Inn. Empanadas, three varieties of paella, plus a variety of seafood, meat and poultry entrées. Desserts include a classic flan, very rich, sitting in a pool of caramelized sugar with its lingering smoky flavor.
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    • Building better burritos

        Modeled after taco stands popular in the southwest, this tiny Royal Oak spot is packed with plenty of energy. The entrées are familiar: burritos, tacos, quesadillas and tacons (a fried tortilla folded into a cone). But add in choices of meats: Mexican beef or chicken (a stewed variety), grilled chicken or steak, Baja-style fish fillet (a mild whitefish fried in a beer batter) or ground beef, along with beans and rice or veggies, then add in your choice of toppings.
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    • Aquatic food chain

        Mitchell’s Fish Market is a member of that new breed of restaurants: the upscale chain. Featuring an ice-filled display case with luscious steaks and bright fillets, the selection of fish varies from day to day. You choose the fish and its style of preparation. The experience is up and down.
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    • Family fusion

        Head chef Michael Lum says it best: "The idea is Asian-based, new-American cooking. It's traditional American cooking with Asian spices to give it a new flavor." Lum's extended family help in the kitchen and elsewhere: an uncle makes fresh noodles and Lum's wife creates sushi and other appetizers. Spotlight dishes include the duck Macao (marinated in spices, deep-fried, then coated with a spicy Asian sauce) and tomato soup (a thick broth with crispy sizzling rice, Chinese veggies and big chunks of chicken and shrimp).
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    • Sushi, superbly

        An element of beauty is part of everything from the marble-topped sushi and yakitori bars to the tatami rooms and conventional tables with settings in shades of blue, green and brown. The full range of Japanese fare offers diners an extensive choice, and service by the courteous, well-dressed staff adds to the stylish feeling of the place. Even beef teriyaki, so often a routine dish, is superb here. This is much more than a typical strip mall eatery.
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    • Primo pasta

        These adjoining restaurants serve robust Italian food made of fine ingredients. The Cook’s Shop specializes in tableside cooking — anything that can be flambéed is, and this can be lots of fun to watch. The family-style salad is tossed with big croutons and a wondrous, better-than-Caesar dressing. The egg and semolina pasta is made in-house, which may explain why it tastes so good no matter what sauce is on it. Don't skip the pasta appetizers, and try the sublime cherries flambé (served with vanilla ice cream) for dessert.
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    • Ode to soup

        Forté presents a menu full of magical combinations -- complex, rich flavors served with style. Every dish our reviewer tried was splendid, and the dessert tray looks like a work of art.
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    • Still quite a catch

        Desserts, especially the peach cobbler, are some of the best features of this upscale yet casual fish place. Try the warm chocolate cake with ganache if you've got time to wait -- it takes 17 minutes to prepare. Other excellent dishes include the salads, bouillabaisse and roast pork loin. A lower-priced lunch menu makes it an affordable treat.
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    • East of Benin

        This storefront restaurant features the food of Nigeria, and the menu is organized around the starches: yams, cassava and rice, with a “stew” added. One popular dish, red stew, combines tomatoes, sweet red peppers, habanero chiles and onions, seasoned with ginger, thyme and curry powder — ingredients that repeat in Nigerian recipes, in various proportions. Finally, add in a meat (often goat, also beef and pork) along with legumes such as peanuts and beans. For the ridiculously low price of $1.25, try a meat, chicken or vegetable pie.
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    • Surprising seafood & stout

        Lily’s Seafood is a hot spot that offers not only a stunning interior and friendly service, but most importantly a kitchen that believes homemade is best. In keeping with this idea, even the beverage menu includes house-made root beer, cream soda and four varieties of house-brewed beer. Both the entrées and desserts are special, full of mixtures of both flavor and texture.
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    • Labor of love

        This isn't just a commercial enterprise — "It's a labor of love," says Stanley Grot, the Polish-American Cultural Center's president. You can get most of your Polish favorites here, beginning with czarnina (duck) soup, which alternates with flaczki (tripe) every other Friday. Pierogi come in potato, cheese or kraut (five for $5.75). Kielbasa is tasty and fresh and is served with sauerkraut. Two kinds of Polish beer are offered, along with the usual American varieties.
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    • Malt shop classics

        Comet Burger's concept of the '50s is pink vinyl and stainless steel chairs, Formica tabletops decorated with little boomerangs (you'll recognize them when you see them), album covers on the walls, lots of TVs, and, of course, sliders and malts. The malts alone are worth the trip. As for the sliders, they're sliders, but grilled onions improve the flavor considerably.
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