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Elissa Karg

124 results
    • A chain of noodles

        Noodles & Company’s fast food is made with fresh vegetables and organic tofu. The menu is internationally inspired, and includes specialties from China, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, Russia (mushrooms stroganoff with egg noodles), the Mediterranean, the United States and, of course, Italy.
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    • Thinking inside the box

        At first look, one of the most intriguing things on the menu looks like it’s a $60 choice. But look again. The multi-course “Bento Box for Two” is an unbelievable bargain. The $30 tab is for both diners. The menu is long and complex, and it includes Korean specialties, such as bimbimbap and bulgoki.
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    • Sweetness and spice

        Bombay distinguishes itself with the word “grille.” You can watch the process through a window in the dining room. Grilled items are prepared in tandoors, deep clay ovens heated by charcoal fires. Most Indian restaurants use gas, which is cheaper, but can’t produce the flavor of a charcoal fire. Seekh kabob — minced lamb cooked on a skewer — tastes nothing like the Middle Eastern variation called shish kafta, because of its rich spice blend. Chicken malai is marinated in yogurt and spices, then grilled. There are three vegetarian kebabs, some with paneer, a mild homemade farmer’s cheese. This is a great place for carnivores and vegetarians to commingle; the entrée menu is about evenly split between the two. Wine, beer and liquor are offered.
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    • A bite-sized bistro

        The concept is "a new American bistro" — cutting-edge food served tapas-style, for sharing and grazing. It’s a good idea, one used more or less successfully elsewhere, but what makes this restaurant work so well is creative flair.
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    • A savory synthesis

        At Yossi’s, much of the menu is similar to what you might find in an Arab restaurant - kebabs, hummus, shwarma, tabbouleh, baba ghanoush, fattoush. The differences are both subtle and substantial. Dishes with the same names may be seasoned differently or prepared differently. Israeli cuisine also incorporates influences from Morocco, with its emphasis on spices and slow cooking. Couscous, another Moroccan staple, appears in two of the entrées. Yossi’s is very veg-friendly. All of the appetizers are vegetarian, as are four entrées. Both the lentil and vegetable soups are made without meat stock.
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    • Beyond Beans & Cornbread

        Suburban soul food restaurant located in West Bloomfield with a moderately priced menu that focuses on chicken and ribs. No trans fat is used. Expect great service.
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    • The table eclectic

        Enjoy casual dining and creative cuisine such as steak, seafood and pasta in a relaxed atmosphere. Extensive wine list. Upstairs balcony dining. Vegetarian friendly.
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    • A northern odyssey

        The menu doesn’t pretend to be the world’s most authentic — you can order a hamburger or a slab of ribs, wing dings or chicken tenders — but it does include some unusual dishes, such as baby octopus in a wine sauce. Reganato, loin of lamb baked in wine, olive oil and oregano, is another specialty. The best-seller is lamb shank simmered in a tomato sauce. It is falling-off-the-bone tender without a trace of fat, and it’s offered with several different sides — roasted potatoes, rice pilaf, pasta, or just vegetables.
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    • Greektown goes global

        The menu was culled from major world cuisines — Asian, Mediterranean, French, South American, Caribbean and more. It’s fusion food, with Mediterranean given the most influence. Entrees include the expected salmon and lobster, steaks and skinless, boneless chicken, as well as king crab legs, braised lamb shank, Alaskan halibut and Asiago-encrusted New York strip with basil and garlic
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    • Chef knows best

        With most entrees priced at less than $20, including a choice of soup or a lovely house salad garnished with dried cherries and pine nuts, the menu includes both old favorites, as well as some very unusual dishes, all presented with a sophisticated flair.
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    • Flavor to savor

        Open since May 2000, Assaggi Mediterranean Bistro has become a popular dining place, known for its attractive atmosphere and creative menu. Its Mediterranean dishes are influenced by Italian, French, Middle Eastern and Spanish cuisines, including such items as wood-fired pizza, antipasti, sea bass and sea scallops with hand-rolled pasta. Owners George and Josie recommend first-timers try the lamb rack with pistachios and pine nuts. Full wine list, sangria and a full bar are available to accompany your lunch or dinner. There's seating for 80 in the courtyard patio, where a garden of tomatoes, peppers, basil, flowers and other herbs -- and statuary including reproductions of the Venus de Milo and Michelangelo's "David" -- conjure the atmosphere of Tuscany. And, happyily, the sound of the fountain drowns out the traffic on Nine Mile Road.
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    • East of Benin

        This storefront restaurant features the food of Nigeria, and the menu is organized around the starches: yams, cassava and rice, with a “stew” added. One popular dish, red stew, combines tomatoes, sweet red peppers, habanero chiles and onions, seasoned with ginger, thyme and curry powder — ingredients that repeat in Nigerian recipes, in various proportions. Finally, add in a meat (often goat, also beef and pork) along with legumes such as peanuts and beans. For the ridiculously low price of $1.25, try a meat, chicken or vegetable pie.
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    • Color, flavor & fire

        Bright colors, rich flavors, exotic aromas. With more than 150 items on its menu, Ashoka wanders from the North to the South, with more legume-based recipes and fiery spice blends. There are even sections of the menu devoted to Indian-Chinese food, a style with a following in India. Full-service bar.
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    • Bringing back Bonnie

        The “kitchen” here is a place where you can eat in for lunch or take out dinner or just stop by for cappuccino and a piece of one of the memorable pastries. Point to what you’d like from their refrigerated display cases and pay by the pound. A place where carnivores, vegetarians and vegans can dine in harmony. Desserts are a point of pride. Open daily except Sunday. Closes at 7 p.m., 6 p.m. on Saturday.
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    • Translating Nine Mile

        Three soups, eight pasta choices, and dinner comes with crusty focaccia, brushed with butter and dotted with herbs. Veal, shrimp, salmon, sole, chicken and filet mignon make up most of the entrées, and they’re prepared in ways that go beyond the ordinary. Open daily except Monday. Full bar, nice selection of Italian and California wines. An enclosed patio in front can seat a dozen diners.
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    • Here's a 'Fly' we want open

        You can get a burger and fries, or bacon and eggs, but after that the menu goes in all sorts of interesting directions, including sandwiches with such names as the Pea Patch or the charmoula chicken. And vegetarians have as interesting a selection as carnivores. Of the seven dinner entrées, only one contains meat, another is fish, and one has a choice of pork, chicken or tofu.
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    • Making it look simple

        As Maxine’s the modest surroundings were trumped by the terrific food. It was the kind of restaurant you weren’t sure you wanted to talk about — maybe you wouldn’t be able to get a table on a weekend evening. The remodeled restaurant is more elegant, spacious, comfortable and relaxing, but the most coveted seats are still the stools that pull up to the marble counter surrounding the open kitchen where diners can watch the theater that is cooking as an art.
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    • Sugar in the morning

        The Chocolate Gallery Café seems an incongruous name for a breakfast and lunch place, but this little eatery was built on desserts. The chocolate is spectacular and picture-perfect. And there are usually some non-chocolate options like carrot cake or lemon cheesecake. Breakfast choices include eggs and omelets, pancakes (buttermilk, chocolate chip or potato), French toast and eggs Benedict. The prices are sweet, too. Open 8 a.m.-2 p.m, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
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    • Freshening up your Italian

        A modest place in a suburban strip mall, it doesn’t have the most extensive menu, or the cheapest prices, but what’s there is very good.These classic dishes can be found in most Italian eateries, but here they are just a little bit better. Ravioli, made fresh daily, is served with a bright orange palomino sauce that comes from mixing tomato sauce with cream. The same sauce appears on the gnocchi cappricciosa — perfect little potato dumplings, light as pillows, which the sauce doesn’t overwhelm. A frequently appearing special is angel hair pasta with lovely grilled shrimp and plenty of fresh vegetables, including spinach, onions and tomatoes.
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    • Happy family

        An unusually homey setting for a Japanese restaurant, the prices are a bargain. The $13.50 combination dinner includes a bowl of miso soup, a salad (American-style), a California roll, chicken teriyaki made with breast meat, two shrimp tempura and an assortment of vegetable tempura, rice and dessert. Offers half a dozen noodle soups, including udon, rice noodles and egg noodles (ramen) dessert is often bread pudding served with a creamy vanilla sauce, swirled with chocolate.
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    • Getting pie-eyed in Birmingham

        Brooklyn is considered the home of the North American pizza, and the owners of Brooklyn Pizza describe their pies as New York-style pizza cooked in a brick oven, fueled by coal or wood. This method creates a thin, crisp crust that snaps and shatters when you take a bite. This is one place where you can still watch the pizza chefs flip a disk of dough in the air. Ice cream, gelato and Italian ices are made on the premises.
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    • East meets West Dearborn

        The cuisine really soars is at the sushi bar, manned by chef Sam Ness. The food emphasizes Japanese cuisine but successfully incorporates Mediterranean flavors. After 10 p.m., Crave the restaurant morphs into Crave the lounge, with DJs spinning and plenty of action at the bar. Saketinis in many fruity variations are a specialty of the house.
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    • Workweek fare

        Other entrées include fettuccine Alfredo, fish and chips (made with whitefish instead of the usual cod), mesquite-grilled shrimp, grilled ham steak (with fresh pineapple and golden raisins in a coconut butter), grilled chicken breast with chili mole, and, of course, steak. Hamburgers are made from sirloin steak, ground right in the kitchen.
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    • Catering to the nostalgia crowd

        A blast from the past: blue plate specials, blue suede shoes, photos of Elvis, sliders. “A home-cooked meal at diner prices,” is how Kelly Battaglia describes the restaurant she opened with Jay Quattrocchi this summer. If you are nostalgic for the ’50s, you’ll want to check it out.
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    • Grub heaven

        Zingerman’s Roadhouse presents "unusually good American food," declares a neon sign over the roof, in a setting that harks back to the day when weary travelers could recharge with a comforting meal by the roadside. The Roadhouse is a sprawling place with a semi-open kitchen, full bar, two dining rooms and very good food.
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