March 08, 2016

38 stunning photos of women's protests in Detroit

Over the years, Detroit has seen a number of strikes and protests led by women.  From sit-down strikes in major department stores and restaurants to picket lines in support of UAW, the city has seen how powerful women's voices can be. Enjoy this nostalgic look back, courtesy of Virtual Motor City.

All photos are courtesy of Detroit News Collection, Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University.

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1970s | Group of women with signs march on sidewalk near building, participating in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society.
1970s | Group of women with signs march on sidewalk near building, participating in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society.
1970s | Group of women with signs march on sidewalk near building, participating in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society.
1970s | Group of women with signs march on sidewalk near building, participating in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society.
1970s | Group of women with signs participates in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society, in foreground magazines such as "Women's Day" burn in a hibachi.
1970s | Group of women with signs participates in Alice Doesn't Day, a one-day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women to draw attention to the work that women perform in society, in foreground magazines such as "Women's Day" burn in a hibachi.
1970s | Group of women from the National Organization for Women stand under the awning at the entrance to the Detroit Athletic Club.
1970s | Group of women from the National Organization for Women stand under the awning at the entrance to the Detroit Athletic Club.
1970s | Group of women from the National Organization for Women stand on steps inside the Detroit Athletic Club.
1970s | Group of women from the National Organization for Women stand on steps inside the Detroit Athletic Club.
1970s | Two women attempt to light magazines and other materials on fire inside hibachi, at a one day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women called Alice Doesn't Day, to draw attention to the work that women perform in society, with women carrying signs behind them.
1970s | Two women attempt to light magazines and other materials on fire inside hibachi, at a one day work stoppage organized by the National Organization for Women called Alice Doesn't Day, to draw attention to the work that women perform in society, with women carrying signs behind them.
1970s | Women wearing traditional clothing of long skirts, shawls and head scarves stand together holding signs, one reads, "We shall pray in Jerusalem, soon," on sidewalk in front of unidentified building.
1970s | Women wearing traditional clothing of long skirts, shawls and head scarves stand together holding signs, one reads, "We shall pray in Jerusalem, soon," on sidewalk in front of unidentified building.
1970s | Women wearing saris and head scarves stand together holding signs, one reads, "Palestinians are human too, what about their human rights," on steps of unidentified building.
1970s | Women wearing saris and head scarves stand together holding signs, one reads, "Palestinians are human too, what about their human rights," on steps of unidentified building.
1930s | Large group of women, identified as Cigar Girls, march with picket signs, reading, "Factories are not prisons" and "We demand shop elections," at unidentified location in Detroit, Michigan. "Sitdowning became a popular tactic among disgruntled workers, especially among the predominately female work force of Detroit's tobacco companies," from Up in smoke: Cigar making in Detroit by Thomas L. Jones, special to The Detroit News.
1930s | Large group of women, identified as Cigar Girls, march with picket signs, reading, "Factories are not prisons" and "We demand shop elections," at unidentified location in Detroit, Michigan. "Sitdowning became a popular tactic among disgruntled workers, especially among the predominately female work force of Detroit's tobacco companies," from Up in smoke: Cigar making in Detroit by Thomas L. Jones, special to The Detroit News.
1930s | A large group of women march down Detroit, Michigan street in support of striking U.A,W. workers at Dodge. "The sit-downers were supported by thousands of pickets, a mass demonstration of more than 50,000 in Cadillac Square and a Women's Auxiliary that conducted various activities to boost morale on and off the picket line..." from American Vanguard: The United Auto Workers During the Reuther Years, 1935-1970, by John Barnard.
1930s | A large group of women march down Detroit, Michigan street in support of striking U.A,W. workers at Dodge. "The sit-downers were supported by thousands of pickets, a mass demonstration of more than 50,000 in Cadillac Square and a Women's Auxiliary that conducted various activities to boost morale on and off the picket line..." from American Vanguard: The United Auto Workers During the Reuther Years, 1935-1970, by John Barnard.