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Wednesday, August 20, 2003

The young and the cultured

Posted By on Wed, Aug 20, 2003 at 12:00 AM

Marketing a product toward teenagers can be a financial gold mine. That's why the Roseville Theatre, at the corner of Gratiot and Utica in Roseville, pulls out all the stops. Functioning as a coffee shop, indie movie theater, ice cream parlor, local music venue and techno dance club, the theatre is perfect for young adults who are interested in exposing themselves to a little culture, while still maintaining a safe haven for the ever-present coterie of those under 21. It all started in May, when Roseville Theatre owner John Kurczak decided to move his other popular spot, the Wired Frog (then in Eastpointe), to the theatre's location. Keith Nida, the artist developer at the theatre said that there is much in store for the venue that has brought in big-name music acts Factory 81, Motion City Soundtrack and Eminem's rhyme-spouting posse D-12. The theatre plans to screen more independent flicks made by local filmmakers, and book additional national acts when they roll through town. "What we're hoping is that if, say, a band is playing at St. Andrew's downtown," said Nida, "they'll stop by here first and maybe do a CD signing."

Don Jordan is an editorial intern for Metro Times. Email letters@metrotimes.com.

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