Outfit yourself 


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$15 - Sunglasses, Incognito Eyewear

In 2014, iconic Royal Oak retailer Incognito closed its doors forever. But the brand hadn't seen its last days. Incognito lives on in the form of an online eyewear company that sells trendy sunglasses. Their styles span the gamut from cat eyes to round frames, from wayfarers to steampunk-style offerings. Oh, and no need to break the bank just to sport a cool pair of shades, most frames from the Madison Heights-based company are just $15.


$225 - bikini, Maggie May Swimwear

A bikini from Maggie May Swimwear doesn't come cheap, but you can bet you'll be the only gal at the beach sporting a unique, knitted suit. Local Magdalena Trever created this line of suits, and her work has been featured in publications from StyleLine to Sports Illustrated. Using yarn made from bamboo, silk, and cotton, the suits are crafted with careful consideration of a woman's curves. Many of her designs are one of a kind, but even those that have been replicated are vastly different from what you'll find at Target.


Peacock Room

Pop by Rachel Lutz's Peacock Room inside the Park Shelton in Detroit and you'll spy flirty dresses, colorful cardigans, and breezy shawls that are perfect for a summer evening in the city. She also sells cool shades, vintage-style accessories, wedge sandals, and bright bags. Can't find what you're looking for? Hit sister store Frida — it's located just a few steps away and carries a bevy of unique accessories that are sure to punch up any summer outfit.

15 E. Kirby St., Detroit; 313-559-5500; facebook.com/peacockroom


Can't bear the thought of spending half your paycheck on summer threads? Regeneration sells used and vintage clothing and shoes, making picking up some shorts and a few tank tops a little easier on your wallet. The Pleasant Ridge shop also buys clothes from the public, so you can make your summer shopping expedition that much cheaper by bringing in that pile of clothes you haven't worn in a year. Pro tip: While the flagship location in Pleasant Ridge only buys and sells men's and women's clothing, the Clawson store also deals in maternity and kids clothes.

23700 Woodward Ave., Pleasant Ridge; 248-414-7440; 126 E. 14 Mile Rd., Clawson; 248-589-0500; regenerationclothing.org

Dunwell Dry Goods

As work continues on Ride It Sculpture Park, a skate park helmed by husband and wife artists Mitch Cope and Gina Reichert, Dunwell Dry Goods is primed to serve Hamtramck's growing skate scene. Previously known separately as skate shop Chiipss and print shop the Barber Shoppe, the two shops were rebranded as Dunwell Dry Goods last summer. The shop sells skate gear and apparel, including designs from local outfitters SMPLFD. They also have a gallery space, full screen printing services, and even a mini ramp for you to practice your skateboard tricks. Cowabunga!

10229 Joseph Campau St., Hamtramck; 313-874-5336; facebook.com/dunwelldrygoods


Maybe you aren't the sort of gal who likes short shorts, neon bikinis, and rubber flip flops. Maybe you have a little more style than that. Maybe Royal Oak's Saffron is probably more your speed when it comes to summer style. The bohemian boutique focuses on the kind of lacy frocks and tie-dyed slip dresses that wear perfectly at an outdoor summer shindig. And their wares aren't all super girly. They also carry vintage-inspired band tees, bright patchwork backpacks, and fringe-y ponchos.

308 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248- 541-8000; facebook.com/saffrongirl

Thrift on the Avenue

Down the strip of Cass where Thrift on the Avenue sits, there aren't any other clothing stores. There's a shop for dogs, a place to get ice cream, a few boutiques that specialize in home goods, even a store with everything for the perfect bachelor pad — but Thrift on the Avenue is the only place to pick up threads. They carry men's and women's gently used clothing, including jeans, dresses, suits, and ties plus shoes and accessories. Oh, and their bargain bins are nothing short of spectacular.

4130 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-649-7226

Blue Velvet

Kory Trinks runs this little boutique on Division Street in Eastern Market and you really never know what kind of fun frock you're going to run into when you stop in. Get crop tops, overalls (they're in again, we promise) and the occasional pair of kicks, all perfect for the summer season. Trinks bought thousands of pounds of vintage clothing off her friend Dan Tartarian and keeps her store stocked with fun, one-of-a-kind items. You really never know what you'll find.

1353 Division St., Detroit; 734-231-7272; facebook.com/bluevelvetdetroit

Classic Books

We're always surprised when this charming, well lit and well-organized store gets left out of the usual lists of great area bookstores. So we want to remind you that this is here, and eager to supply you with summer reading of all stripes. It's been there for 27 years, now, right across the street from Art Van on Woodward. The store has reasonable prices (they do not sell online), and specializes not only in classic literature, but goes deep into myriad genres —notably sci-fi, adventure, fantasy, and mystery. Owner and manager David Oyerly will always help you find what you're looking for.

Open 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday; 32336 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak; 248-549-0220

Willy's Detroit

The block of Canfield between Cass and Second avenues in Detroit's Midtown neighborhood has experienced a dramatic transformation over the last few years. In short order, a barber shop, craft brewer, runner's shop, and Willys Detroit, a clothing shop. Open 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday, the shop boasts some of the biggest renowned names in fashion. The style-minded individual, if they haven't heard of Willys yet, should jot the name down.

441 W. Canfield St., Detroit; 313-285-1880; willysdetroit.com

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