Graystone Hall 

A Detroit venue where all-ages punk had a home in the 1980s

Graystone Hall

7816 Michigan Ave., Detroit

 

Not to be confused with the venerable (and much grander) Graystone Ballroom, the Graystone was a small venue and social hall on Michigan Avenue. In the early 1980s, it had hosted shows by the Circle Jerks, Black Flag, the Big Boys, Necros, Negative Approach and even the final performance of the Misfits in October 1983. Then, as the first-wave hardcore scene died down, the action moved elsewhere.

In 1986, after the closing of the all-ages punk venue the Hungry Brain in Delray, the Graystone soon filled the void as Detroit's main destination for all-ages punk shows, this time under the management of Corey Rusk of Touch and Go records, then based in Dearborn. Rusk and company brought in such bands as the Descendents, the Meat Puppets and Big Black.

But after a local skinhead gang broke Rusk's jaw, he handed the keys over to Cary "Scary" Safarian, a Bluto-like fireplug of a man who couldn't be intimidated by local toughs. 

But Safarian was also a pretty smart promoter, working out deals that brought in Die Kreuzen, MDC, DRI, the Crucifucks, Bad Brains, Corrosion of Conformity, Dr. No, the Cro-Mags and many more, for all-ages shows with low ticket prices. But even for Safarian, it was tough going. He had to guarantee vegan meals for fussy national punk acts while trying to keep the hall under control, protecting it from the cops, the neighbors, the patrons — and sometimes the bands. It was here that such "outside" punk acts as Boom & the Legion of Doom and Slaughterhouse played sets, the former throwing roadkill and animal parts out into the audience, once upsetting the straight-edge, vegetarian singer of Seven Seconds so much he allegedly burst into tears.

In the end, Safarian was on the way down, getting deeper into narcotics and illicit deals. By 1988, the club was falling apart and mismanaged. Not long after an angry drunk smashed the front doors of the hall in with his car, Safarian left the Graystone and it closed for good. In 1990, Safarian found himself facing 54 years in jail for robbing a pharmacy in rural Calhoun County. Safarian has been in jail since, for almost 22 years.

Though the memories live on, the hall itself is no more, the space having been taken over by a coin laundry several years ago — making it the best place to do laundry while soaking in punk rock history.

More by Michael Jackman

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