Food Stuff 

The Green Dot reopens, Opening Day in Campus Martius, and more

Down the stretch! The Green Dot Stables Lounge was a quirky, horse-themed bar open only on weekdays. When it closed a few years ago, many mourned its passing. The good news is that it's open again — if only for lunch right now. Jacques Driscoll tells us, "We just opened on Monday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is a very soft opening, just to get the staff trained and work out some kinks. We are also still waiting on our liquor license, which got held up due to the drop in population in Detroit." He adds that the Green Dot team is really hoping to get that liquor license in play for the Kentucky Derby on May 5, even if they have to resort to a temporary permit. We wish them luck: If we're sipping a mint julep during the most exciting two minutes in sports, we couldn't imagine a better location for that than the Green Dot. It's at 2200 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit; 313-962-5588; greendotstables.com.


Out of the park On Opening Day, April 5, the action starts on the field, but that won't be the only place humming. Fountain Bistro and Campus Martius Park have big plans too. Just a half-mile down Woodward from Comerica Park, the park will have live music, outdoor bars, an audio broadcast of the game, and a tented VIP area. Also, in addition to the food at Fountain Bistro, except a "food truck rally," with such food trucks as El Guapo Fresh Mexican Grill, Concrete Cuisine, The StrEAT Cart, Jacques' Tacos, Treat Dreams and more. VIP tickets are $20, available on the Fountain Bistro website, fountainbistro.com. 

Matt finish? A bit of a shakeup in Detroit's culinary world: With the resignation of Matt Prentice, the Matt Prentice Restaurant Group is now the Epicurean Group. The renamed company was quick to assure frequent diners that discounts, points and gift cards will still be honored. The Epicurian Group still plans to open Gastronomy in Southfield in the near future.


Hit the trail Local food entrepreneur and Tashmoo Beer Garden organizer Suzanne Vier has added to her Simply Suzanne line of gourmet granolas. She has extended her brand to include a new "Live Simply" line of trail mix. Expect two varieties: Apple rosemary pecan is one, cranberry pepita and dark chocolate the other. They'll run a few dollars for single-servings and $5-$7 for 8-ounce packs. Find them at Kroger, Meijer and Whole Foods in Michigan. For more information, see simplysuzanne.com.


Culinary coup For the first time ever, the American Culinary Federation will hold their regional culinary conference in Detroit. It's pricey, but the celebrities, cooking demonstrations, networking opportunities, trade shows and competitions should be off the hook. The event is geared toward food professionals, but food enthusiasts are welcome. A one-day program badge, which includes breakfast or brunch, is $125. At MotorCity Casino Hotel, April 14-16; for more information, see acfchefs.com.org.


Know of any upcoming food or drink events? Let us know! Call 313-202-8043 or e-mail mjackman@metrotimes.com.


food/thought


My Pizza: 

The Easy No-Knead Way to Make Spectacular Pizza at Home

Jim Lahey

Clarkson Potter. $27.50


A few years back, Jim Lahey introduced the concept of no-knead bread, a process that saves time and energy — and the bother of cleaning mixers and food processors. His latest offering carries the idea into pizza-making, which should usher hordes of pizzaioli into the kitchen to try their hands at making artisanal pies. My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Make Spectacular Pizza at Home, is filled with recipes that span the likes of the basic cheeseless tomato pie to white sauce pizzas, sauceless pizzas, as well as salads, even desserts — with scads of scrumptious pictures. See Lahey's demo at bit.ly/GDMisg.



the works  Imagine a slice of cake that has seven or eight layers, each filled with buttercream or chocolate ganache or fresh fruit. No, you needn't slice the layers one at a time, hoping to keep them uniform. The Zenker Layer Cake Slicing Kit simplifies the task with a slotted mold, a 12-inch baker's knife and a cake lifter. The slotted mold provides a guide for the knife, and the lifter lets you lift the layers one by one so they can be filled. The results will dazzle you — and your guests. A great-looking cake always tastes better.

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