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  • Issue of
  • Mar 9-15, 2005
  • Vol. 25, No. 21

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Arts & Culture

Food & Drink

Music

Blogs

  • Born Into Brothels

    A New York-based photojournalist was recording the life of prostitutes in Calcutta when she came up with the idea of starting a photography class for a group of their children. The crux of Born Into Brothels revolves around her efforts to save a few of these children from their fates, but her humanitarianism obscures the darker issues here. And yet, despite one’s qualms about the slant of the film, it would take a heart of stone not to respond these precocious and in some cases doomed children.
  • Don't have a cow

    Moo Moo’s is serving inexpensive breakfasts, salads, entrées and sandwiches, half of them vegan, all of them as healthy as a brisk walk around the block. Even when a dish includes a bit of cheese, it may be soy cheese.
  • The Jacket

    Adrien Brody recovers a little bit of his dignity after his embarrassing turn in last summer’s The Village with this psychological thriller. Despite the actor’s best efforts, however, the film remains a convoluted freak-out puzzle not worth solving.
  • Imaginary Heroes

    Writer and director Dan Harris (who also penned the X-Men sequel) lays it on thick in Imaginary Heroes, so thick, in fact, that the movie comes off as an inauthentic bundle of soap-opera-worthy revelations bound together with indie movie clichés about angst and the suburban family. Jeff Daniels is refreshingly cast against type as a bullying father who is eternally disappointed by and out of touch with his youngest son, Tim Playing the brassy mother, Sigourney Weaver owns the movie’s few honest and funny moments.
  • Hearts and Minds

    Winner of an Academy Award in 1975 for best feature length documentary, Peter Davis’ anti-Vietnam war classic Hearts and Minds still has the power to outrage and dismay. The film has been restored — the color components were beginning to seriously deteriorate — and it arrives during a period when we’re in the mire of yet another ill-advised and divisive war. In fact, it’s divisiveness more than logistics or motives which link Vietnam to Iraq, and Hearts and Minds is as much about America at war with itself as it is about the tragedy of a foreign misadventure.
  • Be Cool

    A highly disappointing follow up to Get Shorty, the 1995 of the Elmore Leonard novel of the same name. Flat, chaotic and sporting none of the snap, crackle and, pop of the first installment, this drab adaptation of Leonard’s follow up novel Be Cool is remarkably uncool, bogged down by a lifeless and muddled script with underdeveloped characters, forced humor and story ideas that play like discarded table scraps from the first movie.

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