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  • Issue of
  • Oct 1-7, 2003
  • Vol. 23, No. 51

News & Views

Arts & Culture

Music

Film & Screens

Blogs

  • Cet Amour-La

    For the final 16 years of her life, the celebrated French writer Marguerite Duras lived with a man nearly 40 years her junior, Yann Andrea, who adored her. The film is less a re-enactment of the pair's relationship than an overlong musing on the nature of writing. And there is no relief for us — or for them.
  • Mambo Italiano

    Mambo Italiano serves up Montreal’s Little Italy, its inhabitants and the comic tribulations of Angelo Barberini (Luke Kirby), a gay, second-generation Italian-Canadian. Here, the impediment to true love is "coming out." This movie is lighter than a cannoli. It’s amusing, but rarely laugh-out-loud.

  • Small menu, big style

    The frequently changing, seasonal menu has only five entrées, so you can have confidence that anything you order will be done right. There are four appetizers, including scallops with a sauce of cauliflower and almonds, with grapes and raisins. Red snapper is presented atop Asian somen noodles, bok choy and shiitake mushrooms, mildly flavored with curry. A lovely, stylish place.
  • Bollywood/Hollywood

    Bollywood/Hollywood is an Americanized, cross-cultural take on the popular movies churned out by the Indian film industry. It’s Pretty Woman meets Monsoon Wedding. Take away the brown skin and saris and you’re left with an inexpertly executed romantic comedy that pretends to be about culture clash but isn’t.

  • The Milky Way

    The Milky Way (’68) is both one of Luis Buñuel's most specific and most obscure films. Never having achieved the popularity of such other late-period works as the Spanish director’s Belle de Jour (’67) and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (’72), The Milky Way is a film about Christian heresies through the centuries. The famed Spanish surrealist presents his customary dose of deadpan absurdist humor.

  • Demonlover

    All seems to be fair in love and corporate war in Demonlover. The film drifts into murderous corporate espionage with an aloof MacBeth and undertones of a Hitchcock thriller. But shallow characters dissipate the potential voltage of Demonlover and its futile attempt at suspense and tragedy.

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