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  • Issue of
  • Jul 17-23, 2002
  • Vol. 22, No. 40

News & Views

Arts & Culture

Music

Blogs

  • Stylish & Southern

    In nearly five years of restaurant reviewing, I have never had my napkin placed on my lap, but that’s how they do it at Sweet Georgia Brown. The entrées transcend the South, but are American favorites. They include provimi veal chops, fried lobster, crab cakes and filet mignon in a classic béarnaise sauce. We loved the fried green tomato salad ($9), which was served with baby greens and thinly sliced country ham
  • Reign of Fire

    A postapocalyptic fantasy that, in some ways, recalls the Jurassic Park movies, Reign of Fire arises from the ever-smoldering ashes of dragon-slaying myths. Director Rob Bowman ("The X-Files") blows them into a glowing nightmare periodically hidden under a bushel of pseudo-science.
  • Free spirit

    Two new books mythologize the modern American self-invented man.
  • The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course

    If you're a fan of the Discovery Channel's ultrapopular nature show, the cinematic version is a must-see, with that same damn entertaining high-drama show-and-yell — but forget the story and dive into Steve Irwin's refreshing "5-year-old-at-a-petting-zoo" attitude.
  • The Emperor's New Clothes

    Simon Leys' novel, The Death of Napoleon, gets translated by director Alan Taylor into a filmic flight of fancy wrapped in the aura of a Hans Christian Anderson fable, and reinvents history as we know it by plugging in a "what if?" — with Ian Holm as Napoleon.
  • Halloween: Resurrection

    Does a live Webcast of college kids locked in a haunted house sound especially scary or clever? Not in this seventh sequel to John Carpenter’s seminal slasher, Halloween. Don’t look for the depth Jamie Lee Curtis brought to her last Halloween outings — it’s the last thing you should expect from this glorified B-movie.
  • Lovely & Amazing

    Like her debut feature, Walking and Talking, director Nicole Holofcener's sophomore effort is a carefully observed slice of life, lightly comic, thinly plotted and surprisingly engaging. It centers on a family of women who, in varying ways, have serious issues of self-image.

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