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  • Issue Archive for
  • Apr 10-16, 2002
  • Vol. 22, No. 26

News & Views

Arts & Culture

  • Wonderwomen
  • Wonderwomen

    There's an edgy hilarity in the visual stereotypes explored in "Women Who Ruled," at U-M's Museum of Art ... & With the recent death of Joseph Wesner, Detroit's art community has lost one of its premier creative forces.



  • The Fluffer

    The Fluffer is as convincing as a baritone drag queen with a five o’clock shadow. Its imitation of life in the sex industry (from gay porn to lap dancing) manages brief spurts of recognition, but mostly wobbles along like a first-time floozy in heels. In a word, yuk.
  • Human Nature

    For its first 20 minutes or so, screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's follow-up to his witty conceptual coup Being John Malkovich looks like it's going to be one of those wretched failures that become bad-movie legends. But his unique comic sense prevails, peppered with a surprising amount of insight into, well, human nature — with Tim Robbins and Patricia Arquette.
  • Little Otik

    Based on an old fairy tale, Czech surrealist Jan Svankmajer's film tells the story of a barren couple who adopt a tree trunk that bears a grotesque resemblance to a human child, which comes to life and develops a rapacious appetite for human flesh, growing bigger after each grisly meal.
  • High Crimes

    The odd-couple crime-fighting duo seems a cliché. But then along come Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman — like those requisite surprise witnesses in every hackneyed courtroom drama — to give our worn-out defendant a fresh chance and to dress the old genre up in new clothes.
  • Big Trouble

    When the Hollywood machine manufactures a surplus of running gags and plot lines of contrived-to-be-comic coincidences, and assembles them together into a cheap caricature of criminal dark comedies like Pulp Fiction, the result is director Barry Sonnenfeld’s latest model.
  • Family Thai

    Rexy’s is an upscale version of a successful formula. The interior is interesting and elegant, with a saltwater fish tank and bold, tropical murals. For an appetizer, try koong houm pa ($6.50), large shrimp stuffed with minced pork, ensconced in a paper-thin wrapper, then briefly fried. Served with a sugary-sweet plum sauce, it's a lovely beginning. With most of the entrées, you can select your protein: chicken, beef, pork, tofu, shrimp, scallops or squid.
  • Riding wild

    A journey to that wet dream at the end of the Mexican road.

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