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  • Issue of
  • Nov 1-7, 2000
  • Vol. 21, No. 3

News & Views

Arts & Culture

Food & Drink

Music

Film & Screens

Blogs

  • Just Looking
  • Just Looking

    This look at carnal curiosity in 1955, directed by actor Jason Alexander ("Seinfeld"), is a charming, ribald memory tale about the rocky transition from innocence to experience. Nothing flashy or earth-shattering here, just solid performances and a story told with clarity and kindness.
  • Water Drops on Burning Rocks
  • Water Drops on Burning Rocks

    Director François Ozon’s (See the Sea) adaptation of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s one-bedroom drama exposes and dramatizes the games couples play. Sex is power, life is a game and love is trump — implying that relationships are performances apotheosized in the sex act.
  • Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2
  • Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2

    The monetary success of The Blair Witch Project made a sequel inevitable, but since its unique style was a source of much of its appeal, any duplication would be anticlimactic. Unless somebody could come up with a really killer script. And guess what, folks — apparently nobody could.
  • Downriver opa
  • Downriver opa

    Brick archways and a pretend grape arbor overhead contribute to the atmosphere, but it's basically your family bar scene. Dinner starts with "Opa!", of course, along with warm, lightly toasted pita triangles. Skordalia, the pureed potatoes-and-garlic dip, is biting and good. Both lamb and chicken gyros are nicely done, wrapped in an excellent warm, thick pita. A dessert of bougatsa comes free with your meal.
  • Venus Beauty Institute
  • Venus Beauty Institute

    This light comedy is a vehicle for French actress Nathalie Baye, who made her debut in Truffaut's Day for Night (1973). Here she plays a woman who works in the beauty shop of the title, and who, unlucky in love, finds her last chance may have arrived in the form of an amiable stalker.
  • The Legend of Drunken Master
  • The Legend of Drunken Master

    Alcohol is to Wong Fei-Hong (Shanghai Noon's Jackie Chan) as spinach is to Popeye: Drinking fills him with a weird power and turns him into a goofy fighting machine. Chan proves himself to be the Buster Keaton of kung fu, brewing up a unique blend of martial arts and slapstick comedy.

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